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BYU's Williams pleads not guilty to misdemeanor underage drinking charge

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  • runnerguy50 Virginia Beach, Va
    March 26, 2014 1:47 p.m.

    BleedCougarBlue, the answer to the question is he is a football player. They have special rights that no other human in America has.

  • BleedCougarBlue Enid, OK
    March 26, 2014 12:03 p.m.

    Hmmmmm......I'm confused. This might be a misdemeanor in the legal sense but drinking is against BYU's Honor Code so how does this not result in Williams being temporarily suspended from the team? Maybe he approached Bronco before the story broke/on his own?

    Good luck, Jamaal, to making better decisions in the future.

    One way or another, we've all been there.

    Go Cougars!

  • DeepBlue Anaheim, CA
    March 25, 2014 8:49 p.m.

    I can just see CB kicking and screaming because Jamaal and Bronco have already dealt with this situation behind closed doors and whatever they've agreed to will remain confidential.

    It's interesting that the individuals who have the least respect for BYU's Honor Code are the same individuals who are the most adamant about seeing it strictly enforced.

    They obviously completely misunderstand the fundamental purpose of the Honor Code.

  • backpacn Sandy, UT
    March 25, 2014 8:35 p.m.

    Sorry to disappoint the BYU haters, but despite their dire, unfounded predictions, Bronco and Jamaal already addressed this issue over a month ago and it's already been resolved.

    Nothing to see here, move on.

  • CBAX Provo, UT
    March 25, 2014 4:37 p.m.

    Is he over 18 but under 21?

  • Veritas Aequitas Fruit Heights, UT
    March 25, 2014 2:40 p.m.

    Chris,

    You quoted me word for word. What part do you not understand?

  • Greg4BYU Provo, UT
    March 25, 2014 1:03 p.m.

    So, Chris. What do you think should be the penalty for these "multiple" infractions? I have a feeling that no matter what it ends up being, you are going to scream.

    I'd be interested in hearing ahead of time what you think the penalty should be.

  • ekute Layton, UT
    March 25, 2014 12:35 p.m.

    Y Grad / Y Dad,
    He's a well known football player charged with breaking the law. This would be news at any University. Am I vindictive? Well, if the article was about a Utah football player it would be followed with 400 comments from happy valley.

  • Chris B Salt Lake City, UT
    March 25, 2014 12:26 p.m.

    Veritas

    "I would, but I lack you character and high moral standards"

    You would lie to the honor code office? Isn't that against the honor code? I guess the honor code doesn't mean much then huh?

  • Veritas Aequitas Fruit Heights, UT
    March 25, 2014 12:04 p.m.

    Chris B

    Salt Lake City, UT

    cougsndawgs,

    So should Jamaal exercise his legal right to lie to the honor code office as well if that could possibly lead to reduced consequences? After all, its his legal right to do that right?
    ---------------------------

    I would, but I lack you character and high moral standards.

  • Chris B Salt Lake City, UT
    March 25, 2014 11:28 a.m.

    cougsndawgs,

    So should Jamaal exercise his legal right to lie to the honor code office as well if that could possibly lead to reduced consequences? After all, its his legal right to do that right?

  • Y Grad / Y Dad Richland, WA
    March 25, 2014 11:26 a.m.

    ekute
    Layton, UT

    "It's a matter of public record, you can't keep it out of the news. If you're so proud of you're "higher standard" than don't complain when you're players are held to it."

    Vindictive much? No body is complaining that he is being held to the honor code, just that it doesn't need to be compounded by spreading it all over the headlines. It IS a matter of public record. What transpires between him, the Honor Code office and his coach is NOT a matter of public record, and it is not hypocritical or inconsistent for BYU fans to be "proud" of our higher standard, but wish kids who may have run afoul of it could work out their circumstances in private.

  • Cougsndawgs West Point , UT
    March 25, 2014 10:53 a.m.

    Chris:
    One more time then I'm done because this is getting redundant. If you know the law having worked in that field there are only 3 pleas one can make: Guilty, not guilty, or no contest. The law stipulates that a guilty plea or no contest plea are the defendant waiving due process and accepting the penalty.The judge also understands that a not guilty plea is NOT the same as saying your innocent. You said a plea in abeyance is "saying he didn't do it". Not true in all cases (and you know that). It is a temporary stay on the charges and punishment with stipulations and time parameters for the defendant to prove themselves and not get into further trouble. This in no way infers that the defendant is being dishonest or lying. My brother went through this process and admitted his guilt to the prosecutor and the judge (I was there with him) but used abeyance to show that he would comply with the law in the future, thus keeping it off his record. At no time was he lying or dishonest with the judge or prosecutor.

  • Christopher B Ogden, UT
    March 25, 2014 9:04 a.m.

    @Cougndawgs, I understand the legal process very well, I worked in the legal system for a couple of years.

    But you're still confusing his legal right with honesty. Of course a plea in abeyance is often used and of course it would lead in less punishment. But citing how often its used has nothing to do with the question of "Was Jamaal honest"

    Cougsndawgs, if you're under the belief that anything that is legal is also "honest", I'd suggest you learn a little more about the legal process.

    A plea in abeyance IS saying he didn't do it. At that time the accused can get together with prosecutor and attorney and they review how much evidence there is and negotiate a lesser deal. But its dishonest to deny guilty to the judge if(I said if) in fact a person is guilty.

    If Willaims could deny guilt to the honor code office should he also do that Cougsndawgs? After all, that similar to denying guilty when replying to the charge right? After all, then maybe he could negotiate a much less sever punishment with the honor code office. Isn't that your reasoning?

  • Christopher B Ogden, UT
    March 25, 2014 8:57 a.m.

    @moderateinmagna, I'm not sure where you're getting confused. Its quite simple really. If Bronco and the honor code department review the situation and conclude there is evidence he did indeed drink, and if Williams continues to deny he drank(as he plead not guilty to the charge of underage drinking) that would be dishonest - as he told the judge he was not guilty of drinking. Would lying be another honor code violation?

    I've never suggested he doesn't have the same rights as anyone, but again, just because he may have a legal right to do something has nothing to do with honesty or the honor code. Its legal to lie. However, its against the honor code to lie. So if he lies and says he didn't drink and yet if(notice, I said if) there is evidence he did drink, would that be another honor code violation?

    Like I said moderteinmagna, not sure what part of this confused you. Let me know if I can help you understand further.

    Williams is a great talent, and I just recommend he be honest. I'm shocked anyone would disagree with that.

  • moderateinmagna MAGNA, UT
    March 24, 2014 10:49 p.m.

    Chris B
    Salt Lake City, UT

    If he pleads not guilty is that an additional honor code violation if its determine(by the honor code or bronco) that he did drink?

    After all, isn't being honest part of the honor code?

    He broke the law and should suffer the consequences.dont try to say anjybody is misquoting you here is the exact thing you said and you did say[ honor code or bronco] so who is misquoting you.

  • Cougsndawgs West Point , UT
    March 24, 2014 8:41 p.m.

    TedH & Idablu:
    I'm simply trying to explain to Chris that pleading not guilty does not mean the accused is saying he didn't do it (lying, as Chris is insinuating with Jamal). People plead not guilty because by doing so they can meet with the prosecutor and discuss options like plea in abeyance that will be better for Jamal in the future. If he just pleads guilty that goes on his permanent record, while plea in abeyance allows him to meet certain stipulations and time without further delinquency established by the judge, after which the charge and conviction are wiped from his record. That is not being dishonest it is utilizing due process to give an 18 yr old a chance to prove himself and provide the best outcome for him. If Chris understood that half of accused persons use not guilty pleas to allow them a plea in abeyance option, he would realize that it's not dishonesty, it's about seeking the best possible outcome even if one is in fact guilty. Jamal isn't necessarily saying he didn't do it, he's making sure he is doing what's best for his future.

  • BYU Joe MISSION VIEJO, CA
    March 24, 2014 7:27 p.m.

    Thank goodness he did this in March - We need him come September.

    Oh and I have no idea what he did as I am forgetting it right now. But I am getting a Tee Shirt together that says "Free Jamaal"

    You know as in give him the ball and break him out of the backfield and let Jamaal run free - what else did you think I meant?

  • idablu Idaho Falls, ID
    March 24, 2014 6:23 p.m.

    Gotta go with Chris on this one. You guys are making a bigger deal out of his post than it really is.

  • Ted H. Midvale, UT
    March 24, 2014 6:03 p.m.

    Veritas: I'm a BYU fan but I don't see where Chris has implied Jamaal isn't due the same rights as anyone. But legal doesn't equal honest, and that's what Chris is pointing out.

  • Cougsndawgs West Point , UT
    March 24, 2014 4:46 p.m.

    Chris B:
    Pleading not guilty does not mean Williams is being dishonest. Part of due process is the ability to enter a plea in abeyance. In order to get a plea in abeyance one has to plead not guilty even if they were in fact breaking the law. It's a legal issue, not an honesty issue, but leave it to you to judge so quickly. A plea in abeyance allows him an opportunity to clear it from his record while pleading guilty would stay on his record. It would help to understand how the law works before throwing further accusations at people.

  • Uteology East Salt Lake City, Utah
    March 24, 2014 4:38 p.m.

    Williams, 18, was charged with being a minor with a measurable concentration of alcohol in his blood, breath or urine, a class B misdemeanor, for an unspecified incident on Feb. 16.

    ----------

    What was the unspecified incident, a party? Then big deal. If so I wonder how many else got arrested?

    As far as the honor code, that's between him and the HC police.

  • nhatch82 Eagle Mountain, UT
    March 24, 2014 4:20 p.m.

    @aggie5

    "These type of issues would never happen in Logan."

    Uhh....you must have missed the whole Jarred Shaw drug bust in December. You know he was your leading scorer on the basketball team that got suspended and had a 10 day stint in jail for drugs. Couldn't have happened at USU? This would be considered problem at any institution because he is underage and it is illegal. This isn't just an honor code violation people. Yes some institutions would just sweep it under the rug, but that's just how some institutions do things

  • Chris B Salt Lake City, UT
    March 24, 2014 4:19 p.m.

    Buster and utah ute,

    Wow you guys are making all sorts of things up and misquoting me

    Never did I suggest he shouldn't have the same legal rights as anyone.

    I simply said he should be honest.

    Or do you think being honest isn't part of the honor code?

    Are you two seriously justifying lying?

    I have been clear that IF(never did I conclude he broke any law) he broke the law he should be honest.

    Can't believe some of you are disagreeing he should be honest.

  • runnerguy50 Virginia Beach, Va
    March 24, 2014 3:44 p.m.

    Chris B is right. If Williams drank when he said he was innocent it's an Honor code violation. I'm a Cougar fan and like Bronco but some of our fans want separate rules for the football team. How sad.

  • Buster Fruit Heights, UT
    March 24, 2014 2:56 p.m.

    Chris B

    Salt Lake City, UT

    Veritas,

    I said very clearly "if" it's determined he drank.

    Would disagree that being dishonest goes against the honor code?

    And if(like I said the first time, if) he drank should he be honest and admit it?

    ===============
    Chris B

    Salt Lake City, UT

    If he pleads not guilty is that an additional honor code violation if its determine(by the honor code or bronco) that he did drink?

    After all, isn't being honest part of the honor code?

    He broke the law and should suffer the consequences.
    =================

    Dude, you said honor code or Bronco. You never mentioned his rights as a citizen.

    Then claimed he broke the law and should suffer the consequences.

    No mention of court, due process, or the right to state his case.

    Like I said, you went way over your line.

    I say it would go a long way to man up and give the kid an apology.

    Words come back to bite you ChrisB.

  • UtahUte91 Sandy, UT
    March 24, 2014 2:41 p.m.

    Sorry Chris, but you've gone way over the line on this one expecting anyone to give up his Constitutional Right to due process.

    Aren't people of other religions also expected to tell the truth? Or do people of faith automatically surrender their constitutional rights to due process?

    As is said in the Bible, he who is without sin, let him cast the first stone.

  • Chris B Salt Lake City, UT
    March 24, 2014 2:27 p.m.

    Darren,

    He has been accused of underage drinking. Pleading not guilty means he denies the truthfulness of the charge.

    I agree it has implications for how it goes through the court process. But honesty is honesty.

  • jarka-rus Layton, Utah
    March 24, 2014 2:24 p.m.

    Just aren't anymore more role models in any sport at any university in college sports, so glad I grew up in the day where you could look up to sports figures without finding out later they were losers

  • Chris B Salt Lake City, UT
    March 24, 2014 2:21 p.m.

    Veritas,

    I said very clearly "if" it's determined he drank.

    Would disagree that being dishonest goes against the honor code?

    And if(like I said the first time, if) he drank should he be honest and admit it?

  • idablu Idaho Falls, ID
    March 24, 2014 2:06 p.m.

    @EdGrady

    I agree with your comment with a slight chuckle. Unfortunately, I fear his punishment will be more severe, if he was indeed drinking, and based on the evidence presented in the article, he was.

    I am just frustrated that with so much riding on this little indiscretion--his career, his teammates, his coaches--he chooses to do that anyway. Yes we all make mistakes, especially when we are young. But still puzzling to me, nevertheless.

  • Weber State Graduate Clearfield, UT
    March 24, 2014 1:37 p.m.

    From what I hear about his mom, if I were him, I would fear her much more than I would the Court or BYU if she finds out it's true. She's a class lady and Jamaal will have lots of "splaining" to do

  • Ed Grady Idaho Falls, ID
    March 24, 2014 1:27 p.m.

    Slap his wrists - put him in some type of counseling - get him on the field.

  • Darren Rowe Heber City, UT
    March 24, 2014 1:17 p.m.

    Chris B,

    A not guilty plea doesn't mean Jamaal is denying his guilt, it simply means he is forcing the court to prove his guilt. (It doesn't make much sense to me either, I would think the term not guilty means he is saying he is innocent. The difference is whether the court needs to prove the guilt.)

    I personally think that if Jamaal had alcohol in his blood, breath, or urine, it would be pretty hard to win with a not guilty plea. Maybe there is something he and his attorney have up their sleeve.

    Remember, if there is any shadow of a doubt regarding his guilt, he will be ruled innocent.

  • PAC12Fan South Jordan, UT
    March 24, 2014 12:52 p.m.

    No way! Due to the honor code, this just doesn't happen at BYU like it does at all the other schools across America. Good talent.

  • Elcapitan Ivins, UT
    March 24, 2014 12:03 p.m.

    Eighteen is the age of stupid. Fortunately a few escape the blight. Obedience to gospel light and principles is the key.Some Kids learn it at a much younger age as taught and observed in their family life, other learn it the hard way.

  • USAlover Salt Lake City, UT
    March 24, 2014 11:56 a.m.

    If the kid wants to make it right, then Ute and Cougar fans should all want this 18 year old to succeed.

    The Rivalry banter is still pathetic...

  • wahului Stockton, CA
    March 24, 2014 11:43 a.m.

    Unless proven otherwise, Jamaal is not guilty, period. You can bet his mother knows already.

  • Dutchman Murray, UT
    March 24, 2014 11:36 a.m.

    The Honor Code really has nothing to do with this. It is a violation of Utah State Law for anyone under the age of 21 to possess or drink alcohol. As for the BYU Honor Code the school will deal with this as it sees fit. Utah also has team rules. If a player breaks a state law I am sure that is a violation of team rules. Like BYU, Utah would deal with this at it befits its team rules.

  • Veritas Aequitas Fruit Heights, UT
    March 24, 2014 11:04 a.m.

    Chris B

    Salt Lake City, UT

    If he pleads not guilty is that an additional honor code violation if its determine(by the honor code or bronco) that he did drink?

    After all, isn't being honest part of the honor code?

    He broke the law and should suffer the consequences.
    ====================

    Wow, Chris B.

    The kid is guilty already? He has no right to due process? Ya want me to mark it down?

    Dude, ya just went over even your own line...

  • motorbike Cottonwood Heights, UT
    March 24, 2014 11:03 a.m.

    Ed Grady,

    To clarify things a bit further regarding my last comment ...

    Underage (under 21) drinking is often referred to as consumption or possession by a "minor" but the "minor" is in reference to being under the age of 21 and not to being a "minor" in the sense of not legally being an "adult."

  • CougFaninTX Frisco, TX
    March 24, 2014 10:56 a.m.

    My guess is that he probably gargled with Listerine which left a trace of alcohol on his breath.

  • motorbike Cottonwood Heights, UT
    March 24, 2014 10:53 a.m.

    Ed Grady

    "Just curious, why is the Deseret News and the Tribune reporting the arrest of a minor. I thought the identity of a minor was supposed to be confidential."

    He's not a minor. He's an underage drinker, but he's not a minor.

  • VegasUte Las Vegas, NV
    March 24, 2014 10:52 a.m.

    Lay off the kid. Let him work things out with his team.

  • Ed Grady Idaho Falls, ID
    March 24, 2014 10:40 a.m.

    Ooooops. Just curious, why is the Deseret News and the Tribune reporting the arrest of a minor. I thought the identity of a minor was supposed to be confidential. I'm not dismissing what Williams is accused of doing, but when was the last time one of the locals newspapers reported the name of 16-year-old kid arrested for shoplifting?

  • Chris B Salt Lake City, UT
    March 24, 2014 10:30 a.m.

    If he pleads not guilty is that an additional honor code violation if its determine(by the honor code or bronco) that he did drink?

    After all, isn't being honest part of the honor code?

    He broke the law and should suffer the consequences.

  • dww722 North Salt Lake, UT
    March 24, 2014 10:19 a.m.

    This is such a non-issue. Slap the kids hand and move on.

  • ekute Layton, UT
    March 24, 2014 10:00 a.m.

    It's a matter of public record, you can't keep it out of the news. If you're so proud of you're "higher standard" than don't complain when you're players are held to it.

  • lixircat Indianapolis, IN
    March 24, 2014 9:55 a.m.

    It's just sad. LDS or not, he's been there long enough to know better. He's seen HC issues with other players in multiple sports.
    In my four years at BYU I can think of only 2 times I ever even SAW alcohol (outside the chem labs). Why put yourself in a position where these issues is even an option?
    I'm hoping for the best for him though. Let's all remember that he is more than just an awesome RB. He's a young man. A young man that needs direction, guidance and support.

  • 54-10 Salt Lake City, UT
    March 24, 2014 9:40 a.m.

    Nothing to see here.

    Everyone move on.

  • DEW Cougars Sandy, UT
    March 24, 2014 9:36 a.m.

    It is none of our Beeswax Buisness! Way to go DN and Utah County Dept. So we don't know the whole scope between JW and HC. Enough for now.

  • motorbike Cottonwood Heights, UT
    March 24, 2014 9:25 a.m.

    I hope he misses zero football time for this. He's a teenager who made a very minor mistake. Even as a Ute fan, I see no reason for BYU administrators to do a dang thing on this other than issue Williams a warning. If there was a second time then, and only then, should some kind of a field-time suspension be considered.

  • Meckofahess Salt Lake City, UT
    March 24, 2014 9:16 a.m.

    As a BYU fan for 50 years I understand the honor code conerns here. As these young athletes agree to the honor code (as Jamal did) then having been caught making a choice contrary to the code, he should stand accountable to it now. That said, it would be best if it is handled with sensitivity and confidentially. This is between him and his coaches to work out as far as the school is concerned.

    One could argue that the news media doesn't even need to report these issues when they become aware of it (whether it is a BYU player or a player for that school up north). We all make erroneous choices in our lives, but it doesn't have to be broadcast to the whole community unless it is a major deal - which this isn't in my book. Why is this a public news story? I thought public floggings ended with the dark ages? I guess not.

  • Aggie5 Kuna, ID
    March 24, 2014 9:07 a.m.

    These type of issues would never happen in Logan.
    Go Angie's!

  • Cougar Passion Salt Lake City, UT
    March 24, 2014 9:07 a.m.

    Malihini,
    Given that he entered a "not guilty" plea, I have been wondering if there isn't some credence to what you said. Either a person has been drinking, or he has not. For someone to deny the charge *should* mean that there is no merit to it. Of course, I also understand that if a kid got caught doing something he wasn't supposed to do, he might also deny it regardless of the facts. Hoping for the former, but, if the latter, then we can chalk it up to lapse of judgment and look for him to be given a path to take similar to that of Hadley, probably modified for the fact that he isn't LDS.

  • Snark Provo, UT
    March 24, 2014 9:05 a.m.

    At Williams age, the Utah law says it is a violation to possess or consume any amount of alcohol. This is one that is better left to the BYU and courts. Because a single swallow is enough to convict, the case could result in a conviction based on facts that are so minor that the University response could vary widely. There is no need to prove a certain blood alcohol level (though a breathalyzer is typically deployed), holding a beer in your hand is enough under the statute to convict, even if he never licks the rim (remember it is for illegal possession or consumption).

    He has plead not guilty. I suggest that we wait to comment on much until the outcome of the case. Even then, we should offer our support to both Jamaal and to the coaches and administrations who will certainly impose sanctions if he is found guilty. I have prosecuted many of these cases and the outcomes can vary widely even if there is a plea. Sounds like a good case for a plea in abeyance (if there was indeed a convictable offense).

  • Malihini Northern, UT
    March 24, 2014 8:19 a.m.

    Wow, he was fingerprinted and photographed for this? Was charged with a class B misdemeanor? Seems like an overreaction by Provo's finest. I guess that is what the law is, but still...seems a bit much. I mean he wasn't driving. According to UT's strict drinking laws he may have only had one drink or two. Seems like the over-zealous police force in Provo went a little over the top.

  • Bdamajd Centerville, UT
    March 24, 2014 7:58 a.m.

    There is an awful lot of speculation going on here. He plead not guilty. Whatever happened to "innocent until proven guilty"? I am sure we will all find out whether or not he is guilty in the next few months and then decide if we will be judgmental or just not appoint ourselves to be his judge. I still believe that if all of our choices were in the headlines of the local newspaper, none of us would be completely happy to read about ourselves.

  • bradleyc Layton, UT
    March 24, 2014 7:40 a.m.

    Kids do dumb things. If this is the worse thing he has done, I can live with that.

  • FDRfan Sugar City, ID
    March 24, 2014 7:34 a.m.

    One thing for certain - Williams will know if people are trying to help him or exploit him.

  • Weber State Graduate Clearfield, UT
    March 24, 2014 6:27 a.m.

    FOX reported it first. It puts the Deseret News in a difficult position if they don't report it...as if they are trying to lay cover for BYU.

  • G-Day-M8 WVC, UT
    March 24, 2014 6:01 a.m.

    This is a tough business for BYU and it most certainly will continue to be but all students enrolled at BYU are under obligation to keep the standards of the school and If this report is correct Jamal Williams did not make a mistake but he made a choice.

    I don't like how often the word mistake is used in our language. Depending on the context, mistake often connotes non responsibility, ignorance of the obligation and/or excuse and calls for a dismissal of the wrong without full consequence. Mistakes have consequences too and are sometime very tragic but they are made without willful intent. An example of a mistake might be to add a pound of butter to a recipe when a 1/4 pound is needed or forgetting to carry the 1 in a simple math problem.

    Choice is a word that is used far to little and like mistakes may have unintended consequences but even so, choices are made with willful intent for good or for bad and the chooser is left without excuse.

    If the story is correct, I expect and hope for a future similar to Kyle Van Noy.

  • Darren Rowe Heber City, UT
    March 23, 2014 11:00 p.m.

    "I thought BYU/DN was not going to report this stuff anymore."

    You're right with BYU, but DN never agreed to not report it. The purpose of their entire business is to find the inside information and report it.

    As you can see with the article, there is no comment from Mendenhall, Holmoe, or anyone involved with BYU. They will follow the new policy unless Jamaal decides to personally announce what he did.

    The one exception that BYU gave with their rule is if the police are involved in a criminal investigation, which would be this situation. So this story actually doesn't apply to BYU's policy of staying quiet on this.

  • souptwins Lindon, UT
    March 23, 2014 11:01 p.m.

    This is being reported by those who are assigned to keep tabs of the police/court records. It's pretty common practice by reporters. BYU's not reporting anything pertaining to honor code issues but this is public record through the courts. I don't think this will be a huge deal with the honor code as far as being suspended from school. It will most likely involve some procedures of accounting and follow-through to show the right lessons are learned through both the HC office and the team/coaches. If I were Jamaal, I'd make sure I followed every detail of what I'm asked to do and move forward a better person. His biggest worry is probably facing his Mom-- a police officer and strict lady he respects-- a lot. That could be tough.

  • Ed Grady Idaho Falls, ID
    March 23, 2014 10:54 p.m.

    Ooooops. Just curious, why is the Deseret News and the Tribune reporting the arrest of a minor? I thought the identity df a minor was supposed to be confidential.

  • Uncle Rico Provo, UT
    March 23, 2014 10:54 p.m.

    Re: I thought BYU/DN was not going to report this stuff anymore.

    This is a legal issue. In Utah county, his arrest information is public information.

  • 79Ute Orange County, CA
    March 23, 2014 10:48 p.m.

    There You Go Again...

    ...not reading the article. This wasn't reported by BYU; it was picked up from the police report. The DN reported that BYU wasn't going to comment on honor code violations.

  • BYUalum South Jordan, UT
    March 23, 2014 10:43 p.m.

    I so agree. Why is this a big headline? Let the school and the coaches work with this fine young man in private.

  • There You Go Again Saint George, UT
    March 23, 2014 9:21 p.m.

    I thought BYU/DN was not going to report this stuff anymore.

  • Brave Sir Robin San Diego, CA
    March 23, 2014 8:57 p.m.

    I hope Utah fans will be wise and lay off the smack on this one. Police blotter smack is bad karma, and every university in the country is going to deal with something like this (or worse) sooner or later. Such is the nature of college kids.

    Best wishes to this player - hope he can get his life in order.

  • Meckofahess Salt Lake City, UT
    March 23, 2014 8:43 p.m.

    How does the media get this information? Does the Deseret News hang out at the jail to see if any BYU athletes make a mistake, or does BYU notify the newspaper so there are no surprises later on? For the life of me I don't see why this has to be in the newspaper. If a young man makes a mistake, let him work it out with his coaches or whomever. Really I think it is none of my business (as a member of the community and local predominant religion) what these students do. Just one man's opinion.

  • EightOhOne St. George, UT
    March 23, 2014 8:13 p.m.

    Tradition! Spirit! Honor!

  • Hey Baby Franklin, IN
    March 23, 2014 8:10 p.m.

    No way J...

    Say it ain't so

  • gdog3finally West Jordan, Utah
    March 23, 2014 7:45 p.m.

    Wow, Jamaal Williams is still 18 years old. He runs the football like a man among boys, at least when playing Idaho, Middle Tennessee State and so on. No but seriously, the kid is a real talent and seems like a quality young man. If he is found guilty here, that would likely result in some sort of stiff honor code penalty, but I don't want to go there just yet.

    Young people make mistakes. Heck, so do older people. It's tough with the honor code though. Yeah, if I was a BYU fan, I would probably be crossing my fingers here as well Tom in California. Jamaal Williams is a big part of the offense. But the Cougars should win 10 games and likely more with that soft schedule next year.

  • Tom in CA Vallejo, CA
    March 23, 2014 6:48 p.m.

    Here we go again?? Where there is smoke there is fire?

    These young men need constant mentoring if they're going to stay out of trouble. I am one who is keeping his fingers crossed.