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Comments about ‘New Scout lodge to be named for LDS Church President Thomas S. Monson’

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Published: Tuesday, March 18 2014 11:25 a.m. MDT

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Brother Dave
Livermore, CA

It is Good that this new facility will honor one of the Greatest Boy Scouts of all time!!

One only needs to read President Monson's list of accomplishments to see why this is
appropriate. When I think of President Monson, the words "On My Honor, I will do my Best..."
slways comes to mind.

Congratulations and God Bless!!

I know it. I Live it. I Love it.
Provo, UT

Great decision!

We need less role models like Justin Bieber and more like Pres. Monson.

ulvegaard
Medical Lake, Washington

@I know it .....

We do need better role models than the majority of our current list of celebrities. The problem is that in a society where ultimate success is based upon fame and fortune it is difficult to redirect the attention of society.

The great thing about naming this new lodge in honor of President Monson is that it will be symbolic of a legacy of good choices, life long service and exemplary living. You can't go wrong there. More important than the honor this does to President Monson is the assurance that no one will ever have to apologize or regret having the name Monson and B.S.A. linked together in such a fashion.

portlander
Arlington, WA

Worked for the Church all of his adult life...high Church callings for much of the same...Apostle for many decades. Somewhere along the line someone must realize that it has been a "calling" from the Lord for him to be such a great friend of Boy Scouting? I mean, he has been one of the most prominent representatives from the church to the Boy Scouts of America program. But it's really not a "volunteering" position for him. It has been his duty...a "calling" from the Lord.

However, from my point of view, I wish that more Bishops, Stake Presidencies, High Councils and so forth, took their Scouting duties more seriously. Too many of our boys are not fully participating in Scouting activities and service, and are not being exposed to the great good that Scouting does to prepare a young man for a mission, a life of service, a life of honor and a life of good in this world. For that, we as a people, will suffer.

iluvnz
Vernal, UT

@Portlander

I am a Bishop in an Eastern Utah LDS ward. Throughout my life, although I have been involved in scouting, and had an amazing scout master, I have not been a real proponent of the BSA program. As Bishop I have been trying to learn more; things I should have already learned. I am developing a testimony of scouting and the positive effect it has on our young men. I have wonderful scout leaders in position in my ward and thank God everyday for these great men. Thank you for reminding me of my duty to these sons of God. I recommit myself to them and this program.

G L W8
SPRINGVILLE, UT

Having spent some time working with scouting outside the LDS Church as well as within, two things become apparent: (1) A number of scout units outside the church run circles around some of our LDS Church units, though others don't (2) units outside the church don't have the Aaronic Priesthood to worry about, so leaders within the church often find themselves "choosing" between the priesthood and scouting (they don't have to do so if they gain a complete, trained understanding of scouting as a supportive, not a competitive, program).
Many of the challenges of running a dynamic scouting program at all levels, within and outside the church, rests with a dedicated unit leader (scoutmaster, team coach, crew advisor) PLUS an active, involved, trained committee of adult volunteers that know how to help the boys lead themselves.
This is one of the methods of scouting (labeled "adult association") that needs to be firmly established and practiced. I believe President Monson and the Young Men's Presidency understand this. It needs better implementation at some of the local levels of the LDS Church.

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