Comments about ‘Why breastfed babies are so smart’

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Published: Friday, March 14 2014 8:00 p.m. MDT

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MrMas
Tucson, AZ

Thank you, thank you, thank you! When I first heard about the correlation between breast-fed babies and cognitive development, I said to myself "perhaps moms who breastfeed also do other things that help a child's development." Finally a study that discusses this.

Correlation does not imply causality!

Hey It's Me
Salt Lake City, UT

I bottle fed both my kids and they both got good grades are college graduates. Both my kids have bottle fed their kids and they are extremely smart. What counts is the quality time you spend with your kids.

LovelyDeseret
Gilbert, AZ

We need to decriminalize the breast so that breastfeeding becomes as welcome as drinking from a water fountain.

BlueberryMom
Evanston, WY

Breastmilk has obvious benefits to the child: health, intelligence, etc. That doesn't mean that people can go around looking down on mothers who choose to bottle feed their babies. I agree with LovelyDeseret in decriminalizing breastfeeding though. You really wouldn't believe the glares and "talking-tos" a mother gets when she breastfeeds her baby in public.

I'm baffled by the judgement on both sides; some mothers really get up-in-arms over things that really aren't their choice. It's not my business whether some mother formula feeds--I don't know what all went into that decision. Just like it's not somebody else's business that I breastfeed my baby.

I agree that spending time with your kids has a tremendous impact upon their development, but I also believe that breastmilk plays a part in that, too.

Can we stop the MommyWars and just support each other?

UtahMaus
Orem, UT

I thought the title was a bit off topic, since what it boils down to is that early interaction and early exposure to books was what was most valuable.

As it happens, for medical reasons, I was only able to breastfeed one of my three. I did, however, begin reading to all three of them very early on (I'm a big Jim Trelease fan!) All three were "reading-ready" at four. I haven't seen any significant developmental differences between the three, except that the two girls (one breastfed, one not) talked earlier than the boy (not breastfed), and the youngest (not breastfed) walked earlier than the other two.

Reflectere
Utah, UT

The BYU run article concerning this study is biased to the point of convincing people that "breastfed babies are smarter." My father-in-law e-mailed it to me as a condemnation for our bottle-fed babies. When I researched the data I found that the data did not remotely suggest that breastfed babies were smarter. The data was centered around cogitative related activities - not breastfeeding. While the name of this article is a terrible reflection of the content within, I was happy to read an article which interprets the data correctly.

Please change the name of this article so that it properly reflects what the research data is actually about - and it's not about why breastfed babies are so smart!

sukiyhtaky
us, CA

I made the decision not to breastfeed. I made it clear I did not want to breastfeed, but some self-righteous nurse decided it was the wrong decision and did not give me the shot to stop milk-production. I was extremely angry. She launched La Leche League. I informed them I was not a cow and was not going to breastfeed and to get out. My daughter graduated HS with every honor and a 4.07 GPA. She was never sick, or had a temp or diaper rash NOTHING till she got a slight cold at age 14. I fed her soy milk. She did not get candy or sodas when young and didn't have TV till age 7. She graduated college with a double major and has a very well paying job now. It IS the quality/amount of time you give them. I would suggest the test results were what they were because of the test subjects. Do the same experiment in the inner city and see what results you get. If breast feeding was so good, we wouldn't have generational welfare as low income mom's generally can't afford formula.

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