Quantcast

Comments about ‘Deal ending Count My Vote initiative passes House, Senate’

Return to article »

Published: Wednesday, March 5 2014 7:12 p.m. MST

Comments
  • Oldest first
  • Newest first
  • Most recommended
The Reader
Layton, UT

Count my vote is a good deal for Utah. For too long the caucus system has held the state if Utah captive to a small, vocal, right group who for many years has not represented the will of the people of Utah.

If one studies the history of the United States it is very clear that the best government is a government that is either center left or center right. Extremes on either end represent the fringe of the people. The vast majority of the country has always been best represented by the center with good compromise on both sides of the aisle to produce legislation that has been proven to be the most beneficial for the country. The recent experience with the Tea Party and the past experience in the 50s with the Joe McCarthy hearings are recent examples of the public harm that comes from these extreme fringes of the political parties.

Getting rid of the caucus system in the state of Utah and in other parts of the country would help improve the political mood of the country.

Sal
Provo, UT

well, if this bill predicts the demise of the caucus system as some legislators state, maybe it is a good bill. Farewell to the boring caucus meetings where you cannot get to know the delegates you are voting for.

RedShirtMIT
Cambridge, MA

To "The Reader" that is a lie. The left have equal opportunity to vote under the caucus system. Why should we get rid of a system that cuts back on canidates getting elected because they have more money and can get more name recognition.

You bemoan the Tea Party, while ignoring the fact that within politics the socialists and worse have been pushing liberalism even further left. Do you really want to open up a system that would make it easier for a communist to get elected just because he had more money to get his name recognized?

Eliot
Genola, UT

For many years no one let out a peep about the caucus convention system as it gave to Utah a wide variety of political leaders including: Orrin Hatch, Bob Bennett, Mike Leavitt, Jon Huntsman, and Jake Garn. But then in 2004 when Olene Walker, facing formidable challengers in Jon Huntsman and Nolan Karras, could not get herself on the primary ballot, rumblings began to shake Utah's political landscape. These rumblings burst into full scale eruptions when Bob Bennett, facing delegates angry over TARP and the bail outs, was left off of the 2010 primary ballot. Despite the fact that the convention/caucus system had given Bennett the nomination three times previously, suddenly the system was corrupt and overrun with tea partiers. Lost in the debate is the simple fact that for many years Utah has supported very moderate Republican candidates. That moderation returned in 2012 when Orrin Hatch secured a majority of the convention delegate votes even though his opponent was a political moderate himself with a sterling record of working with democrats in the Utah legislature.

fight4liberty
Herriman, UT

Taking the Caucus system away is taking away more rights and liberties. This allows all good citizens the opportunity to participate in our governmental system, regardless of the amount of money they have raised.

The downfall of our government is that everything is FOR SALE! You can buy anything with money. Just because you have money doesn't give you the right and the knowledge to speak for all people. To watch the cronies (of both parties) in Washington selling the country out is sickening. Its all about them and their status and their paycheck, not about "we" the "people" of this country.

The caucus system does not stop people from voting. People either will or won't vote, it is that simple, sadly enough. Most average people don't feel like their small vote makes a difference, as money controls everything. What our citizens need is more education to show them why it makes a difference if they vote.

to comment

DeseretNews.com encourages a civil dialogue among its readers. We welcome your thoughtful comments.
About comments