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Comments about ‘Dead Sea Scrolls exhibit offers chance to explore sacred connections’

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Published: Thursday, March 6 2014 5:00 a.m. MST

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Craig Clark
Boulder, CO

"....Parry noted that many scholars and hobbyists through the years have attempted to make stronger connections between the Essene and Latter-day Saint doctrine than actually exist...."
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Adherents to any modern religion who study the Dead Sea Scrolls in the hope of finding corroboration of today’s creeds are likely to be disappointed. My knowledge of the Scrolls is very minimal. What I’ve gotten out of studying them in books is a deeper appreciation of the richness of the ancient past and those dedicated souls who diligently preserved written treasures of their time that help us understand more than we may have thought we did.

Salt Lake City is very fortunate to have this exhibit on display. I’d love to have the chance to visit it.

Mister J
Salt Lake City, UT

What if the Dead Sea Scrolls offer overwhelming proof that Christianity should be more Deist/Gnostic?

Craig Clark
Boulder, CO

Mister J,

The Dead Sea Scrolls contain no Christian documents in that they predate the Christian era. But there are the gnostic gospels of the Nag Hammadi Codices which sometimes get confused with the Scrolls. These two collections come from separate archaeological finds.

pakundo
St. George, UT

Actually, the Dead Sea Scrolls are NOT important to Muslims. The only "scripture" of value to Muslims are the Koran and the Hadiths. They teach that since their ideology came after both Judaism and Christianity, Islam supersedes and supplants them, and that Jewish and Christian scripture are null and void, corrupted and unreliable.

d_rolling_kearney
Sacramento, CA

pakundo, Muslims revere the Old Testament as well, and consider themselves an Abrahamic religion, so the Dead Sea Scrolls ARE important to them.

Craig Clark, The Dead Sea Scrolls DO contain Christian documents in that they testify of Christ just as the OT does. Also, your comment that "Adherents to any modern religion who study the Dead Sea Scrolls in the hope of finding corroboration of today’s creeds are likely to be disappointed" is false. There are some excellent books out there that show very striking similarities between LDS belief/practice and those of the Essenes. For Mr. Parry to say that "scholars and hobbyists through the years have attempted to make stronger connections between the Essene and Latter-day Saint doctrine than actually exist" is nothing more than his opinion. Obviously, those other scholars he mentioned would disagree, and they have endeavored to use scholarly methods to prove their cases, instead of taking cheap shots in a newspaper article, completely devoid of any proof. You admit that your "knowledge of the Scrolls is very minimal" so I encourage you to do a little more research on the subject.

gdog3finally
West Jordan, Utah

Contrary to comments above, the Dead Sea Scrolls do contain a ton of spiritual value. If there really is interest in our market as this article claims, then I hope it's an interest in discovery and not just that of inductive insertions that fit one's previous conclusions of faith.

The Book of Enoch is a latter day gift. It's prophetically inspired. Christians, Jews and Muslims of all sects/divisions agree on the righteousness of Enoch. A few of the 4th and 5th century councils within the abominable church dropped 'The Book of Enoch' from the canon of scripture. Decisions on other Hebrew and Greek texts were kept out as well. And despite the Protestant Revolution that took place 1,000 years later, the subtractions of lost scripture stuck. The is also much more scripture and apocrypha that is lost, destroyed, or hidden in the Vatican archives.

The Dead Sea Scrolls offer insight on Old Testament gaps and give specific warnings for our times. Setting aside some traditional evangelical stories based on vague canonical scriptural content is needed, as they have defined the King James Bible since the Awakening cycles and further back as well.

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