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Comments about ‘State lawmaker proposes alternative to alcohol barrier in Utah restaurants’

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Published: Thursday, Feb. 20 2014 10:45 a.m. MST

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gmlewis
Houston, TX

@Schnee - All states prohibit minors from buying alcohol, but in most states the youths are circumventing these legal controls with ease. Apparently, this happens less frequently in Utah.

Brahmabull
sandy, ut

Why do we allow adults (18 and above) enlist in the army, buy cigarettes, but they can't buy alcohol? We call them adults, but only allow them to make some adult decisions, but not others. Why is that? We can't treat them as legal adults on some things, but not others... can we?

BeSmart
Cheyenne, WY

@ Larry
When you lose someone close to you t from a drunk driving incident where the culprit got drunk at a restaurant.
I would support repealing the law if/when a drunk driver kills someone they are charged with first degree murder.
They know what the risks are when they get in a car.

regis
Salt Lake City, UT

I'm not a drinker, but what's the big deal about a wall? When I go to a restaurant and order food it's usually cooked behind a wall. I don't see it get cooked. Big deal.

Do drinkers have some fetish about watching their drink get mixed and poured? Why is it any more important for a drinker to see a drink get mixed than for a diner to see food prepared?

Reasonable Person
Layton, UT

Someone's been reading my comments, because I suggested that two years ago ;)

Brahmabull
sandy, ut

regis

Maybe you don't understand - I will try to make it more clear for you. No, drinkers don't care about watching their drink be poured. Some places do it in the back, some in the front without a wall. The government has forced places without a wall to build one to comply. Some food places (sushi, for example), make the food out in the open, and you can watch. The government doesn't forbid doing that even though most places make their food in the back - it is the choice of the establishment. It should be the same with alcohol. The places that want it in the back can do that, the ones who want it in the front should be able to do so as well. Many places don't have room in the back for all of the liquor and beer - therefore they are forced to build some type of barrier while they pour drinks - pretty ludicrous. Now is it clear?

dwayne
Provo, UT

Regis,

"Do drinkers have some fetish about watching their drink get mixed and poured? Why is it any more important for a drinker to see a drink get mixed than for a diner to see food prepared?"

The pouring and mixing of drinks is something people who pay a lot of money for the right mix care about. Businesses do too. Overpouring is an issue for those selling alcohol while under-pouring or deliberate incorrect POURS is one for consumers. Try to understand a pour is more than one drink. A consumer is likely paying for a more expensive drink mixed with a cheaper drink.

Consumers who arent just looking to get drunk or full but who are paying for a specific pour or portions of food want to see if the one expensive drink they buy is actually poured in correct portions. I have friends who drink so I understand why this is an issue. Portion sizes are mostly obvious or irrelevant with food. Not so with mixed drinks. They are paying for the right portions but cant see it the way you can food on your plate.

dwayne
Provo, UT

Regis,

It is important to understand that we are dealing with monetary as well as safety issues. A casual and knowledgeable drinker can realize if a pourer is making life threatening mistakes in pouring a drink if they can see it being poured. They can realize that they are being poured more of a drink with greater alcohol content and the mix isnt right and refuse the drink because they dont want a problem with being drunk. What happens if the person pouring the drink flips the portions around and pours too much of the drink with greater alcohol content. An observant consumer who pours their own drinks at home who has learned a lot from Google can literally save their own life and that of others simply by knowing that the mix is wrong and they are being given two three times the alcohol content that should be in the drink while if that mistaken pour was out of sight they and other drinkers who are there themselves or each other. My friends have called out bartenders for pouring people more than they should. Probably saving lives.

Denita
WEST VALLEY CITY, UT

gmlewis Houston, TX
A recent study showed that almost all underage drinkers in Utah get their alcohol from their own homes. That validates the "Zion Wall" practice, which obviously discourages underage drinking in public establishments. If alcohol consumption is reduced for minors, then this is a practice that should be copied by every other state. Utah should be proud!

Do you realize you've made the point against the zion wall? If kids are getting their alcohol from home, restaurants are not the problem. Further, studies have shown that kids pick up drinking by watching their parents drink. Therefore, if the parents order a drink, from behind a wall or not, the kids at their table see them drinking it once it's been brought to the table so, again, the wall has done absolutely nothing but make it more difficult for a business to operate.

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