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Comments about ‘Utah lawmaker wants to privatize state golf courses’

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Published: Tuesday, Feb. 18 2014 4:55 p.m. MST

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stevo123
slc, ut

And if the courses fail to make money we can turn them over to the prison relocation committee. Prime land sitting there to make a few very rich.

Monsieur le prof
Sandy, UT

It actually sounds like a good idea. Why is the government involved in golf courses anyway if they can't be self-sustaining? Maybe they could raise the prices a buck a round each year for the next couple of years to make ends meet. Or maybe they could offer special fees for the slow days/times to entice more players to come out.

drich
Green River, Utah

Are legislature can find money to bail out our national
Parks but none for our rural state parks in which they new from the beginning
That Those parks wouldn't make money when they established them in the first Place.

John Locke
Ivins, , UT

The vast majority of those who play golf are the retired, many of them are living on fixed incomes. If you raise the cost per round, the state shoots itself in the foot as fewer will play the more expensive courses, and they will eventually be shut down.

Wasatch is the premier course in the state of Utah and with its location, and undoubtedly brings in revenue to local businesses from those outside the state who want to play it. I have played Wasatch many times, and all of the courses indicated, playing Green River many times in my life.

We give money away in huge amounts to those who cannot or will not work, with little "return on investment", but insist on selling off golf courses so that a few can become rich from it and the state can receive the tax revenue it badly needs to give it away without any "return on investment". The retired, those who have paid taxes all of their life, can take a hike. They are no longer a priority.

It is a solution without a problem, IMO.

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