Comments about ‘Ways to combat the post-high school athlete blues’

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Published: Wednesday, Feb. 12 2014 3:32 p.m. MST

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JSB
Sugar City, ID

The great attention student athletes get in school, in the media and everywhere else is an unhealthy thing. Ignoring the accomplishments of non-athletes is also unhealthy because they feel like a nobody. Perhaps more attention should be paid to debaters, musicians, etc. and less attention to athletes. One simple way thing we could do that would save the schools hundreds of thousands of dollars and be psychologically more healthy, would be to abandon inter school athletics and switch to intramural programs. That way, kids could engage in healthy athletic activities and competitions but not have their egos unnaturally inflated which is a formula for long term frustration.

Osgrath
Provo, UT

I don't know what you are talking about. I got cut from my high school basketball team and never felt like a nobody. The debaters and musicians I knew were pretty satisfied with their state. I have attended a bunch of 9th-grade junior high school basketball games this season, including the recent championship game in the local region, and the stands were packed with students, standing the whole game, cheering their teams. You want to deprive the kids of that? Those that are not varsity athletes still have the intramural opportunities through city and county recreational programs.

A kid who is psychologically damaged by not being a high school athlete is going to find coping with all the disappointments and frustrations that life has waiting for him over the next number of decades very difficult. As pointed out, the number of high school athletes that become professional athletes is relatively infinitesimal - only 480 play in the NBA, for example; subtract from that those that came from outside the U.S., and you can see that 99.9% of all high school hero-stud-athletes are going to get their comeuppance eventually, which should satisfy you on that count.

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