Comments about ‘Letter: Buy my vote?’

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Published: Tuesday, Feb. 11 2014 12:00 a.m. MST

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John Jackson
Sandy, UT

Some have spoken of bribes. I don't know whether it classes as bribery, but it is the giving of gifts in the hopes of receiving votes. It seems to happen more before convention than after, for the candidate often doesn't have enough money to buy something for all the voters, but does have enough to buy something when the number of electors is reduced to just the delegates. Breakfast is served in the name of meeting the candidate. Is that akin to a bribe? If the candidate didn't think it would do some good, he or she wouldn't be buying those breakfasts. And, the delegate does have a tendency to consider the breakfast a nice gesture and to accept the goodwill as reason to vote for the candidate. It's hardly an outright bribe, but it is the influence of money.

Candidate Jackson
Sandy, UT

Witness Chris Stewart sending books to the delegates. Witness the chances of a restaurant meal for delegates in the caucus-convention system versus a restaurant meal for voters once the race is past convention.
Candidates might offer donuts and hot chocolate while campaigning after convention, but there are not too many sit-down meals after convention. It could be argued that rather than reducing the influence of money, the caucus-convention system actually is the right-sized playground for it, at least the right-sized playground for gift-giving.

Furry1993
Ogden, UT

@RedShirt 12:56 p.m. Feb. 11, 2014

You realize, don't you (since I've said it often enough) that I'm a mainstream Republican and have been a Republican since 1969 when I turned 21 years of age and became eligible to vote. why do you think I would have any interest in what is going on in a caucus or primary for the Democrat party? As to why I stick with the Republicans when they have been hijacked to the far right fringes and only the far right fringe-dwellers have any say in what happens -- I am echoing the thoughts of Sen. Carl Schurz (R-Missouri, 1869-75), who said: "My country, right or wrong. When right, keep it right; when wrong, put it right." My party is going WAY wrong, and I am trying to put it right.

RedShirt
USS Enterprise, UT

To "Furry1993" unfortunately you are wrong. The Republican party has been hijacked by Progressives, just like the Democrat party. The only difference between them is how fast they are marching towards socialism. The Tea Party and other similar groups are trying to get the Republican Party to return to its conservative roots.

You may want to caucus for the Democrats because they could be more aligned with your values. The point I was making is that if you don't feel that your voice is being heard by the Republican party, maybe there is another political party that does match your values. Just because you were a Republican in 1969 does not mean you have to remain a Republican today.

To quote Ronald Reagan (and others) "I didn't leave the Democratic Party. The party left me". If the party is no longer what you believe in, what is holding you there?

Furry1993
Ogden, UT

@RedShirt

What's holding me in the Republican Party? The desire to recover it from the far right fringes and return it to what it should be (and what it was prior to the early 1990s when it was hijacked far right). When the policies of people like Barry Goldwater (Mr. Conservative, who defined conservatism in the 1960s) and Ronald Reagan would cause people to call them RINOs and when they couldn't win a place on a general ballot because they're not far right wing enough, you KNOW that there is something drastically wrong with the Republican Party. As Sen. Carl Schurz (R-Missouri, 1869-75), said (as I quoted above): "My country, right or wrong. When right, keep it right; when wrong, put it right." My party is going WAY wrong, and I am trying to put it right.

RedShirt
USS Enterprise, UT

To "Furry1993" you do realize that people like Ronald Reagan would be called "far right extremists" by today's Republicans. Even JFK would be called a "far right extremist" by today's standards.

So, which is it. Do you want to return to Reagan values of small government and tax rates that encourage growth and hiring? Or do you want to go with the mainstream GOP and just be a slow moving Progressive?

If Bush and McCain are examples of the party mainstream, take a close look at their policies. They are exactly the same in nature as the extreme left in the Democrat party. The only difference is magnitude.

So the question becomes are you going with the mainstream Progressives in the GOP or are you going with the Tea Party and that group that wants to return to the Reagan idea of limited government.

Utefan60
Salt Lake City, UT

I have attended caucus meetings. It didn't represent the majority neighborhood. And to Mike Richards comments ....who are these "party elites"? The party I once called my own isso fractured. The party elites are now the people or groups (such as the Eagle Forum) who marshal the most troops to the caucus meetings. It does not represent the peoples views.

cmbennett1
OGDEN, UT

I have personally seen candidates meet with delegates at lunches that the candidates paid for.But since politicians often get their meals paid for by lobbyists some may not see this as a problem. Another issue I have with the caucus system is that it sometimes is not possible for everyone to attend the caucus. Some people have to work in the evening, some people are away serving their country in the military(they can vote in primaries and general elections by absentee ballot), some people are away serving their Church on Missions, and some may either be sick themselves or have sick children. In addition there is a group of people who may attend but cannot legally participate, these people are Federal Employees(such as those who work at Hill AFB) and Active Duty Military personnel who are registered to vote in Utah.

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