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Comments about ‘BYU student caught in avalanche dies; back-country danger remains extreme’

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Published: Sunday, Feb. 9 2014 12:10 p.m. MST

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franc
Kirkland, WA

I'm very sorry for her family ... a sad story.

Lasvegaspam
Henderson, NV

To Ashleigh's family: I am so sorry for your loss.

San Diego
Orem, UT

Very sad. It would be prudent if organizations that supply or rent snow shoes, cross country skis and other winter sports equipment were required to provide avalanche beacons or at least have them available for rent.If the customer chooses not to use them then have them sign a required release.

A few years back a worker was buried in a trench collapse. His brother frantically tried to uncover him with a backhoe and accidentally cut off his head.

Avalanche beacons have saved many lives and are essential in quickly locating the victim in time to avoid death from suffocation. Had the rescuers know Ashley's exact location they may have been able to save her.

SillyRabbit
Layton, 00

How does the 2003 construction worker fatality play into avalanche beacons? It was during work on Staten Island digging a sewer pipe and is very specific about the man being decapitated by the backhoe, so I will assume that is the story you were referencing.

I also did not find any information about it being his brother, merely a colleague.

I do not think it supports your opinion about organizations being required to rent beacons.

Condolences to the family. A beacon would have improved the chances at retrieval and survival.

San Diego
Orem, UT

@SillyRabbit The construction worker death occurred some years back in Salt Lake City. The point I was trying to make is that when someone is buried it is very difficult to know exactly where they are located and sometimes the victim is injured further in the rescue effort. The fact that the rescuers unknowingly piled snow on top of the victim was an indication that they simply did not know where she was. Had she been wearing a transmitter they may very well have been able to locate her immediately and saved her life.

SillyRabbit
Layton, 00

I'd love to read that story to verify your citation of it; it's being near impossible to find via Google.

Yep, that transmitter likely would have helped. Poor woman, poor friends, and poor family. Please be well and grieve however you need.

rlsintx
Plano, TX

Condolences to the family and friends of Ms. Cox.

San Diego
Orem, UT

@SillyRabbit
It was reported in one of the Salt Lake papers but I doubt there it is in the archives as this happened maybe 25 or 30 years ago and they did not have digital storage then. I was in the trenching business at the time so I took particular interest in it from a construction safety standpoint. I guess you will just have to take my word for it that I did not make up the story.

I am not sure why that is such a sticking point. That story really wasn't the point I was trying to make.I was trying to point out that it is extremely difficult to locate buried victims and that there may be a relatively simple way to help prevent similar tragic results in the future. It's somewhat like wearing seat belts and motorcycle helmets. But I think more casual back country snow sport participants may not be aware that the avalanche beacons are available and important to wear.

I am in no way blaming anyone for the tragedy. I am sure everyone involved in the rescue effort did the very best they could to try and save her.

San Diego
Orem, UT

@SillyRabbit
It was reported in one of the Salt Lake papers but I doubt there it is in the archives as this happened maybe 25 or 30 years ago and they did not have digital storage then. I was in the trenching business at the time so I took particular interest in it from a construction safety standpoint. I guess you will just have to take my word for it that I did not make up the story.

I am not sure why that is such a sticking point. That story really wasn't the point I was trying to make. I was trying to point out that it is extremely difficult to locate buried victims and that there may be a relatively simple way to help prevent similar tragic results in the future. It's somewhat like wearing seat belts and motorcycle helmets. But I think more casual back country snow sport participants may not be aware that the avalanche beacons are available and important to wear.

I am in no way blaming anyone for the tragedy. I am sure everyone involved in the rescue effort did the very best they could to try and save her.

mattrick78
Cedar City, UT

very sad.

patriot
Cedar Hills, UT

This is very sad. I have gone snow shoeing for years at Tibble Fork and there are safe and unsafe areas. The trail on the east side of the dam is safe since it winds its way up through a pine filled hollow. Any steep open terrain is not safe and this photo looks to be very unsafe. People need to use common sense.

Irony Guy
Bountiful, Utah

I wish people wouldn't go out there and make us sad...like jumping off a mountain in Zion Park or playing with avalanches.

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