Quantcast

Comments about ‘Gov. Herbert calls his plan for Medicaid expansion a tough sell’

Return to article »

Published: Thursday, Feb. 6 2014 9:31 p.m. MST

Comments
  • Oldest first
  • Newest first
  • Most recommended
DN Subscriber
Cottonwood Heights, UT

Gov. Herbert is a thoughtful guy who seriously cares about getting the right decision for Utah, more than getting a few political points.

I will respect his decision, but if he thinks accepting the federal cheese in the trap is a good idea, then he is wrong this time.

"The trouble with socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money to spend" is still true, regardless of it coming from Utah taxpayers directly, or being laundered through (and skimmed off by) bureaucrats in Washington. It is still a trap that our children and grandchildren cannot afford.

No on MEDICAID expansion, Governor.

FT
salt lake city, UT

I'll say it's a tough fight. Sounds like there may be trouble brewing in our conservative paradise.

Sal
Provo, UT

I'll vote against Herbert if he runs again having signed us up for the Medicaid expansion.

grouchyoldman
Arden, NC

Will someone please think about "legacy costs" and " how long" will Washington pay. Can anyone in government think past the end of their nose or their political future? In fact we are praying for their medical treatment the minute they walk into the ER with or without Medicaid. The Federal Government ownes 60% of the land in Utah anyway. Do we really want to have another string tying us to Washington?

jean22
Bountiful, UT

I'll vote FOR Herbert if he runs again having signed us up for the Medicaid expansion!

Utah Health Policy Project
Salt Lake City, UT

How much of Utah's Medicaid program is currently funded by the federal government?
20% ?
50% ?
Nope. The feds pay 70%
That's been the case for decades.

To expand insurance coverage to the 60,000 Utahns currently caught in the "coverage gap," the federal government has promised to pay 100% for the first three years, and 90% into the future--just for the expansion population. That's what states like Colorado, Nevada, Arizona, and New Mexico are doing.

But instead of expanding traditional Medicaid, Utah's Private Option would let Utah use these funds to decide how to run our health-care system using private insurance. The Private Option gives Utah the authority to cut the federal strings and regulations that come with traditional Medicaid. It also lets individuals chose their own private insurance and encourages cost-sharing when possible, giving those covered a bigger stake in their health care.
But most importantly, the Private Option can actually pass the Utah legislature once lawmakers learn more about it.

to comment

DeseretNews.com encourages a civil dialogue among its readers. We welcome your thoughtful comments.
About comments