Comments about ‘Two workers on paid leave after lunch taken away from elementary students’

Return to article »

Published: Friday, Jan. 31 2014 3:16 p.m. MST

Comments
  • Oldest first
  • Newest first
  • Most recommended
jrey2
slc, UT

The Superintendent is sitting behind a desk looking at numbers on a paper. Numbers count kids do not. This is what happens when numbers are all that matter wether it is in reading or lunch. How else can you explain taking away lunches or taking away the classes that kids enjoy and posting test scores outside classroom doors these all stem from the same problem. Kids are numbers and no longer people.

Stormwalker
Cleveland Cuyahoga , OH

"I was hungry, and you told me my lunch account was not paid up. I was thirsty, and you told me that I was lazy and needed to learn a lesson..."

mrjj69
bountiful, UT

i was taught at an early age that wasting food is unacceptable. There were several choices to be made here. The worst one was made.

gridlockisbetter
Antowuk, UT

Perhaps many options had been tried and yet people felt entitled to eat without paying.

Clifton Palmer McLendon
Gilmer, TX

The Constitution does not give the Federal government the power to do or say anything about school lunches, so anything they do or say is unconstitutional.

Sophie 62
spring city, UT

I doubt that it's a federal law to throw away a child's lunch which workers have already dished up because there isn't a positive balance in the child's account. It appears that some lunches were thrown away which were paid for. What happened at this school was not about the federal government. It was about adults being wasteful, and shaming students who have no control over a transaction between adults.
Humiliating children for their parents' actions or lack of action accomplished nothing.
Isn't it bad enough that children do this sort of thing to each other, without adults adding to their difficulties?
As for teaching children that not being able to pay your bills is painful, if those children are aware of family bills not being paid, believe me, they are already in distress and anxiety because of it.
They don't need to be humiliated in school in front of their friends and sometime enemies for something they have no control over.

hockeymom
Highland, UT

1. True, most of Michelle Obama's "healthy" school Lunches are barely palatable. A child who is truly hungry will eat whatever they can get.
2. If a child's parent is having a hard time paying for school lunch, chances are, they don't have much food at home either. In that case, it was criminal to throw that food away in front of a hungry child. The dairy and citrus fruit given will probably cause an upset stomach. Milk and a PB&J would have been more substantial and humane.
3. These were elementary school kids who have no control over the family financial situation, they are merely observers to whatever their parents can or victims to what their parents can't provide.
4. If we're talking about "teaching entitled kids", let's save this lesson for the High Schoolers, who could get a part time job to buy their own lunch.
5. The message those kids will take from this is "You are of no value. You are not even worth the garbage in this can." Kids this age will spend the afternoon in tears, focused on their empty stomach rather than learning anything.

Laura Bilington
Maple Valley, WA

Some parents are irresponsible, period. The schools and the social service agencies see them daily. In 1990, my daughter worked at a Boys & Girls Club and had parents who were furious when the Club closed for holidays --the parents were used to the club being a reliable six-day a week babysitter and meal provider (the dues--don't laugh--for unlimited use of the club facilities, including one meal per day, were $7 a year). But punishing the kids does not make the parent responsible--never has and never will. Is it not our responsibility as a society to care about all children, whether their parents make the grade or not?

Sequoya
Stafford, VA

This is typical of bureaucracies everywhere; but especially in the litigiously oriented U.S. -- where everybody sues everybody else at the drop of a hat. Otherwise good and intelligent people become monsters because they are afraid they will get in trouble if they don't -- and in this case, they get in trouble anyway because the bureaucracy they thought they were serving desserts them. There needs to be less government as noted above; but where you must have it anyway, there must be "wiggle room" to allow people to exercise judgment.

Compare this to a policy interpretation in Afghanistan that got people killed -- no fire support delivered because if we accidentally kill an "innocent" (however defined) we lose hearts and minds. Consequently, U.S. troops died. Same dynamic. Even in simple authority structures, we have to figure out how to let common sense prevail.

billster36
Nies, MI

So what exactly is the difference between "paid leave" and some vacation time? Sounds absolutely dreadful doesn't it? Being put on "paid leave. Sounds like a day off with pay to me.

to comment

DeseretNews.com encourages a civil dialogue among its readers. We welcome your thoughtful comments.
About comments