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Comments about ‘Pentagon relaxes religious dress, grooming standards among troops’

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Published: Tuesday, Jan. 28 2014 5:05 p.m. MST

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Jamescmeyer
Midwest City, USA, OK

I wouldn't think much about this if not for the subdued but consistent push against Christianity and Christian ideals in the military-the religions that comprise the vast majority of enlisted and commissioned religious individuals in the United States.

Then there are more temporally practical concerns; endowed members of the LDS Church don't wear the white garment in military uniforms, we wear colors more conducive to the tasks those in uniform tend to perform, especially in foreign contingencies. If my religion, rather, necessitated a beard that impedes gas masks or a turban that disrupts the discipline of uniformity or the wearing of a helmet, I'm confident God would in such cases allow appropriate adjustments.

But outside such concerns, it's nice to hope that perhaps the DoD may be re-awakening to the substantial religious presence within it.

kiddsport
Fairview, UT

Jamescmeyer brings up the definitive argument against the wearing of beards in the military- a gas mask does not protect a soldier with a beard. A pilot cannot depend on an oxygen mask functioning properly in decompression at altitude if he has a beard. That is why commercial pilots are prohibited by Federal statute from wearing a beard.
Turbans are another issue. A uniform explicitly demands conformity, otherwise, there is no "uniformity." Is it that difficult to understand? We could redesign our "uniforms" so that everyone wore a turban, but the utility of the uniform would be degraded and the efficiency of the soldier is impacted.
This is further evidence the strength of our military is being undermined from within and from the top.

John Pack Lambert of Michigan
Ypsilanti, MI

Mikey Weinstein is the arch-enemy of freedom and individual rights and should be given no voice. As usual his view that other people speaking is any threat to your writes runs counter to the 1st amendment. Him and his fellow travelers should admit the truth and call their organization the "anti-speech lobby". It is others rights to free speech that they object to.

CAIR is a bunch of colaborators in Hamas and their terrorist activity. There are much more responsible and truly freedom loving voices of Muslims in the US. Specifically Muslims who will accept the right of individuals to choose their own religions without fearing government punishment.

I have to agree with the Sikhs. It is high time the military makes an unconditional statement that turbans are allowed.

In a pluralistic country like the United States we should respect the right of soldiers to wear the dress of their religion. These new policies do not go far enough along those lines.

gmlewis
Houston, TX

Of course, soldiers who look distinctly different from their fellows stand a greater chance of being shot at by the enemy.

sg
newhall, CA

I am against the current position of our military. Those with differing religious views and beliefs know beforehand what to expect if and when they enter the military as a career. There are set rules from dress to grooming and as such should never have been relaxed to accommodate religious beliefs and views. The military is NOT a religious seminary. It is the military and as such a determined dress code was established. If this government sees fit to remove religion out of the workplace, school place and federal establishments, then it confuses its socialist/communist agenda the minute it makes these changes in our military.

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