Comments about ‘Wife, caregiver says families living with dementia need support’

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Published: Monday, Jan. 27 2014 7:30 p.m. MST

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LovelyDeseret
Gilbert, AZ

An amazing woman. These stories give me hope and make my burdens a lot lighter. God Bless.

Ken
Sandy, UT

Such a tough story. I can certainly see how more support(lets call it like it is, she's asking for money)would be helpful. But unfortunately there are literally countless "underfunded" programs out there. Sooner or later, governments have to say enough is enough for how much money they can reasonably take from those who are paying taxes.

I certainly hope she has a good support group of family and friends. This is a terrible disease to be certain. I can't imagine your spouse becoming a child.

Iron Rod
Salt Lake City, UT

"Sooner or later governments have to say enough on how much money they can take from taxpayers"

I feel it is a matter of priorities. I feel it is a misplaced priority to borrow money to give it away in the Middle East, specifically Israel, when the needs of our own citizens like this lady and her family are not being met.

What are your thoughts?

ImaUteFan
West Jordan, UT

Ken - I don't think this woman is asking for money. The support caregivers yearn for in these types of situations goes way beyond money.

My mother has been a caregiver for my father (who is also very much like a child) for the past nine years. What she needs in terms of support is . . . understanding, a listening ear, someone to sit with my Dad so she can get away from the constant stress and pressure. Money has nothing to do with the support my mother needs and craves.

MLDmom
West LInn, OR

There are many causes of dementia but when it is a disease that strikes a young person and help, caregiver help not financial, are not available because of a person's age it is very frustrating to the family that can't turn their backs on their loved ones and make it the state's problem. This family is doing all they can to take responsibility for their loved one but there is only so much a person can do without help and respite care. For more information on MLD please visit MLDFoundation.org

Jen D
Puyallup, WA

You are amazing, and I can completely empathize with you. My husband is 44 and has been diagnosed with Alzheimer's. It's difficult to watch as he digresses, initially the diagnosis was frontaltemporal dementia, but then they changed after more tests were run. Your daughters seem to be more understanding and helpful than my children are, what a blessing for you. Enjoy them, make their memories last. My husbands symptoms started when he was in his early thirties, but no one believed us, so the treatment was delayed. Not that it could stop it completely, but could it have given us more time? I am not sure. I know the frustration is what I am saying. You are in my prayers.

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