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Robert Bennett: Obamacare is like a 1955 Pontiac

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  • brian timothy Lehi, UT
    Feb. 3, 2014 10:49 a.m.

    "version of a 1955 Pontiac. It’s large, expensive to own and maintain, and burdened with features many customers don’t want. It’s also likely to rust out in about three years."

    I thought Bennett was describing himself

  • Redshirt1701 Deep Space 9, Ut
    Jan. 31, 2014 10:11 a.m.

    To "UT Brit" you are ignoring the fact that if you have cancer, your best chances of survival are in the US.

    If hte UK system is so great, why are they cancelling operations because the hospitals don't have any beds? See "NHS bed blocking increases to highest level in three years" in the Telegraph and "Lack of beds sees Welsh hospitals cancel 2,500 operations in period of just months, admits NHS boss" at WalesOnline. There we find that not only are people having to wait for important surgeries and for cancer treatments. Where is your concern for the damage that does by delaying surgery?

    Actually, there were not "millions" begging for the reform that the ACA gave. Millions wanted the government to make insurance cheaper. The ACA was pushed through contrary to will of the people. Over 60% of the US did not approve of the ACA.

    It doesn't take first hand experience to see the failure of UHC systems throughout the world.

    Why would the US want to join the world on UHC, when much of the world with UHC is going back to a US type system?

  • UT Brit London, England
    Jan. 31, 2014 2:36 a.m.

    @Redshirt

    Some types of cancers, not all of them, you also include the false positives in your stats as well.

    One of my children was born at around 23 weeks and is alive and well today, she wasnt born in an office either.

    The US still has the worst life expectancy when you factor in accidental deaths, look at the stats. You have some of the worst heart disease outcomes, worst pre natal and antenatal care and some of the worst results for general health in the first world.

    You can keep putting your fingers in your ears and keeping chanting "We are the best" over and over, but my own experiences, the experiences of my friends and all the "socialised" studies you keep pretending have some sort of bias (they arent, look at the numbers) prove that it isnt. You have not done much travelling, take it from someone who has, the US healthcare system is terrible. Why are so many millions of people begging for reform? Why did the ACA come through?

    Maybe one day the US will join the rest of the first world and get some sort of UHC.

  • RedShirt USS Enterprise, UT
    Jan. 30, 2014 4:21 p.m.

    To "UT Brit" I am glad to see that you agree that the socialist biased studies do exist, that is better than most liberals on this site.

    If you want to look at the system, lets look at outcomes. The US has the highest cancer survival rate in the world. They also have the most advanced medical procedures and medicines available. When you factor out the accidental deaths, the US has the greatest life expectancy in the world.

    Lets look at the NHS. It is documented that the hospices are underfunded and cannot properly care for their patients. The wait for certain arthritus medications means that 400,000 have lifetime pain, that could have been prevented. Babies born at 23 weeks or younger are left to die. Elderly women diagnosed with breast cancer are denied treatment. Government funded hospitals lack the staff to bring patients water, let alone care for them. The UK allows 130,000 people to die each year because treatment is too expensive.

    You can keep the NHS, I will take a system that is not known for killing people or leaving them in pain for their lifetimes.

  • UT Brit London, England
    Jan. 30, 2014 9:45 a.m.

    @RedShirt

    Ha, yes higher infant mortality, lower life expectancy, 40 million uninsured, highest cause of bankruptcy, 100,000 dead each year from lack of care, twice cost per person compared to other countries, lowest number of doctors and nurses per 1000, lifetime caps, denial of insurance because of pre existing conditions.............

    All those things above are the sign of the best healthcare system in the world! Curse those socialism baised studies!

    I have never waited so long to see a doctor in an ER than when I was in the States. Never have I waited so long to see a specialist. Oh and go to your doctor and say that you will not be paying for any of his time or treatment and see where that gets you. Think you will be headed to the ER and joining the queue.

    You are trying to argue with the wrong man here Redshirt, I will take the NHS over the insurance companies I had to deal with everytime. Also you do realise that there is a two tier system in the UK right? Well obviously not.

  • RedShirt USS Enterprise, UT
    Jan. 30, 2014 7:52 a.m.

    To "UT Brit" the great thing is that even if insurance companies ration care, that doesn't stop you from getting care. You can go to any doctor and get care. In many other nations the care is rationed, and they don't care how much you are willing to pay.

    I have seen some of the evidence that is used to make the US system look bad. However, those studies tend to be biased and really only measure how socialized the medical system is. So, scoring low in those studies is a good thing.

    I have lived in Argentina, and in Germany. Argentina is a mess, and the German system is about 20 years behind the times in terms of procedures available.

    The funny thing is that you refuse to accept the fact that the UK system is probably one of the worst in the industrialized world. When women have to give birth in offices, elderly at put into programs to expedite their death, and patients are denied essential medications because the government doesn't want to pay, you have a serious problem.

  • UT Brit London, England
    Jan. 30, 2014 2:38 a.m.

    @RedShirt

    "best healthcare system"

    I have lived in the States as well as other countries around the world, please dont make me laugh. The US system is by far the worst I have had to deal with. A mountain of studies, statistical evidence and reports back me up on that as well. You honestly think insurance companies dont ration care? Would an insurance policy pay out millions and millions of dollars for treatment? What are lifetime caps? What are yearly caps? Surely an insurance company would not impose such things right?
    Please list the countries you have lived on for an extended period of time so that we can compare our experiences.

    @Linus

    I have also lived in Canada, principally Ontario. OHIP is very appreciated, almost all of the Canadians I knew like their health care system.

    Question for everyone on here, if the US healthcare system is the greatest, most efficient in the world, why does no other first world country implement it?

  • Linus Bountiful, UT
    Jan. 29, 2014 10:56 a.m.

    I lived in Canada. I was a recipient of free, government-provided health care. My neighbors bragged about their free health care.

    I had some friends who were sick. Some even had malignant tumors. But health care was rationed and geographically distributed far and wide to fairly divide the workload among doctors and hospitals. Initial diagnostic appointments were often scheduled four to six months out in clinics far from home with unknown doctors in unfamiliar surroundings. If the unfamiliar doctor decided the patient needed a scope or a scan or other diagnostic procedure, that was scheduled months down the road in a facility way down the road. Canadian often die before they become a burden to the taxpayers.

    Poor Canadians must beg for transportation to appointments with strangers far from home. Friends who drive them or visit them in free hospitals must pay eight to ten dollars to park their car, and a tv set in the room is twenty dollars per day.

    Hurry and get your new knee or new hip. Soon they won't be available to those over 50.

  • RedShirt USS Enterprise, UT
    Jan. 29, 2014 8:07 a.m.

    To "UT Brit" we also have the best healthcare system in the world. You can't have the best and pay the least. I am proud of the fact that we have the least interference in out of the first world countries. I only wish that we would have less interference.

    Actually, the healthcare system is quite efficient. In private insurance, only 15% goes to overhead and profits. That is much better than the government that operates on 20% to 30% overhead alone.

    Why drag down the US system and start killing people like they do in England or Canada, or other first world nations that ration their healthcare?

  • UT Brit London, England
    Jan. 29, 2014 1:28 a.m.

    @RedShirtCalTech

    The US healthcare system is the least regulated, has the least government interference in the first world. It also costs twice as much as the other first world countries. I dont think government is the problem in that regard.

    Also the US healthcare system is incredibly inefficient, a good chunk of each dollar goes to administration cost.

  • RedShirtCalTech Pasedena, CA
    Jan. 28, 2014 11:31 a.m.

    To "Tyler D" it all depends on who you consider the Right. The John McCains of the world would say that the problem is too much government interference, but they have a government solution for that.

    The problem truely is the government. For example, in the 1980's there were about 800 mandates on insurance companies. Now, there are over 2400 mandates on insurance companies. The regulations that the insurance companies have to deal with are massive, and only add to the cost of insurance.

    If you want to get healthcare to the masses, the insurance companies know how to do that. For example, several years ago IHC set up grocery store clinics. For about $25 to $50 you could get routine care from a medical professional, without insurance. They were shut down for reasons I can't find.

    It was the insurance companies that gave young adults the option of catastrophic insurance policies, not government.

    The insurance companies are driven by profit and competition to deliver the best product at the cheapest cost. The government is not. Within the government administrators are rewarded for expanding and building their empires. This costs money and does not make for a better product.

    Government is the problem.

  • Tyler D Meridian, ID
    Jan. 28, 2014 10:08 a.m.

    @RedShirtCalTech – “To "Tyler D" so what is your solution? Are you looking for a solution from government, or from private enterprise?”

    Good question…

    I typically look to the private sector first until it proves unable to solve real market failures… as is the case with healthcare. After that I would still prefer the most market driven solutions with government intervention only in those areas necessary.

    But it’s also necessary to first agree on what the problem(s) actually are. Many on the Left seem to say that the only real problem is lack of universal coverage while many on the Right… well, to be honest I have a hard time figuring what the Right thinks the problem is. They don’t talk much about universal coverage or even cost - unless it’s what the government is paying for (Medicare), which doesn’t address overall cost but only who’s paying the bill.

    All that said, I thought the Wyden/Bennett bill was the best proposal for solving (in a relatively market friendly way) many of the problems in the industry (e.g., analysis by The Lewin Group).

    What do you think?

  • RedShirtCalTech Pasedena, CA
    Jan. 28, 2014 9:22 a.m.

    To "Tyler D" so what is your solution? Are you looking for a solution from government, or from private enterprise?

  • Tyler D Meridian, ID
    Jan. 28, 2014 8:55 a.m.

    @RedShirtCalTech – “Looking to politicians for a solution to healthcare is the wrong thing to do. Why not go to the healthcare and health insurance professionals and get their advice?”

    A quote from Upton Sinclair is instructive here…

    "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it."

    And if you understand this and the size of our lobby industry (K Street) in this country, you’ll understand why it is so difficult to effectively solve real problems.

    Combine that with one party who sees problems (and the need for government intervention) everywhere but is often ham-handed in their attempts to solve them, and the other party who usually denies there’s a problem at all, or when they do recognize a problem typically has a facile response like “more freedom,” then you’ll really have a sense for just how intractable things are.

  • RedShirtCalTech Pasedena, CA
    Jan. 28, 2014 7:47 a.m.

    To "JoeBlow" why look to the GOP for solutions? Do you go to an OB/GYN when your car needs repair?

    Looking to politicians for a solution to healthcare is the wrong thing to do. Why not go to the healthcare and health insurance professionals and get their advice?

    You want us to choose between socialism, and socialism-lite. Either way, you get the same thing, just different serving sizes.

  • Nate Pleasant Grove, UT
    Jan. 27, 2014 11:14 p.m.

    @atl134 "I had to wait 6 weeks to see a specialist for my health issue a couple years ago."

    Obamacare -- making things worse since 2010.

  • atl134 Salt Lake City, UT
    Jan. 27, 2014 9:47 p.m.

    @wrz
    "You musta been in someplace like Canada."

    Salt Lake City.

    "Are you saying that is an answer to our healthcare dilemma?"

    Nope. I'm just saying blaming our higher healthcare costs on smokers and the obese isn't obvious in the data.

    "But, did he have TV and a magazine rack full of (outdated) reading material in his room?"

    Yes, and maybe, I wonder what the German equivalent of Time is.

  • Mr. Bean Phoenix, AZ
    Jan. 27, 2014 9:20 p.m.

    @wrz:
    "Actually, someone has already thought of it when they advised the elderly needing major healthcare such as a knee replacement or new heart valve... 'to just go home and take a pain killer.'"

    I think it was Obama who said that. Here's the quote from a Google search: "Old people don’t need life saving treatments they can take a pain pill (and be left to die)"

  • JoeBlow Far East USA, SC
    Jan. 27, 2014 8:19 p.m.

    "But you don't ever say if Obamacare fixed them."

    No, I dont think that Obamacare fixed the problems.

    But, the GOP does not even see a problem and would certainly not go along with anything that would address the larger and larger profits of the hospitals and in insurance companies.

    A businessman like Romney, IF, and that is a big IF, was unencumbered by the left and right politics, would approach this as the business issue that it is and could come up with solutions that address the problem.

    But, neither the GOP or the dems (or the american people) would like the solutions.

    So, instead, we have people who are bribed (campaign contributions and lobby) to insure that the problem does not get addressed.

  • Invisible Hand Provo, UT
    Jan. 27, 2014 3:57 p.m.

    @JoeBlow: The reason medical costs are so high is governments restrict supply. They won't allow hospitals to be built "too close" to other hospitals. They grant providers monopoly status with restrictions on who can give care and how. If you want lower prices lower the the restrictions on supply. We could also look at reducing demand. If the payers, including Medicare, were allowed to design co-pays that reflected the cost of services, people would think twice before demanding the most expensive drugs or treatments.

  • wrz Phoenix, AZ
    Jan. 27, 2014 3:28 p.m.

    @atl134:
    "I had to wait 6 weeks to see a specialist for my health issue a couple years ago."

    You musta been in someplace like Canada.

    "They die earlier..."

    Are you saying that is an answer to our healthcare dilemma?

    Actually, someone has already thought of it when he advised the elderly needing major healthcare such as a knee replacement or new heart valve... 'to just go home and take a pain killer.' (as reported recently in the DNews)

    "My one afternoon hospital stay cost around 1,500 just for the room/bed (the entire bill was 18,000 but thankfully I had insurance)."

    You probably were helping to pay for something like an immigrant who came in, without insurance, to have a baby or an indigent with a bad back.

    "My dad's hospital room part of his bill in Germany was roughly 1,000..."

    But, did he have TV and a magazine rack full of (outdated) reading material in his room?

    "His surgery itself was half the cost of what the same surgery would be in the US."

    Our doctors will be charging way less after they become government employees under Obamacare.

  • RedShirtCalTech Pasedena, CA
    Jan. 27, 2014 2:12 p.m.

    To "JoeBlow" you list out problems that we had before Obamacare. But you don't ever say if Obamacare fixed them.

    This is how things stand right now with Obamacare.

    1. Costs have jumped on average over 40%, while benefits have decreased.
    2. Medicare had its funding cut.
    3. The cost of getting care has gone up, and will go up more due to the added taxes imposed by the ACA, and the shortage of doctors that we had before everybody got insurance.

    So tell us, what has been fixed?

    To "Open Minded Mormon" why would you want a German or Japanese model? In Germany the doctors are just now beginning to use techniques that we have been using for over 20 years. In Japan, the government taxes you more if you wiegh too much. Do you not like having the most modern procedures available to you? Do you really think that the director of HHS knows how much you should weigh?

  • Open Minded Mormon Everett, 00
    Jan. 27, 2014 1:56 p.m.

    2 bits
    Cottonwood Heights, UT

    Did you ever stop to consider that might be why the Japanese live 20 years longer than we do?

    And after living in Germany, Japan, England, France and a dozen places through out the United States --
    Life is better elsewhere -- even from Utah.

    You might ask why I don't follow the Utah motto of
    "If you don't like it, leave."

    It's because I feel like Mormon did near the end,
    HIS people were being deceived,
    they were becoming more wicked than the Lamanites,
    and they were the one's falling for the lies of the Gadianton's,
    they were the one's dooming themselves to utter destruction.

    He returned to their ranks, to try to sway them to change - and repent - before it's too late.

  • Tyler D Meridian, ID
    Jan. 27, 2014 1:56 p.m.

    @2 bits – “Having lived in both Germany and Japan... A hospital room there is much like a hotel room.”

    I don’t think you really addressed the question – since the peculiarities of one country (Japan) hardly explain the global differences, and you did not address the surgery aspect – but your anecdote was hilarious!

    Really, I laughed out loud reading it. It that for real?

    Did you enjoy living there or were the enough of these “cultural oddities” that it was strange and off putting. I’ve heard the people are very nice…

    We can all get way too serious sometimes in these discussions… thanks for lightening the mood.

  • 2 bits Cottonwood Heights, UT
    Jan. 27, 2014 1:13 p.m.

    atl134,
    Having lived in both Germany and Japan... A hospital room there is much like a hotel room. So costing the same is not that surprising.

    When on my mission in Japan we would often stop and visit with the men at the neighborhood hospital (because they seemed to have nothing better to do than sit in the yard smoking).

    I would start a casual conversation over the fence by asking a group of guys on the bench if they are sick (to give us something to talk about). The whole group would say, "No... we're on yasumi" (yasumi meaning "vacation"). They explained that the company gave them a certain number of vacation days each year, but they also had a bunch of sick days, but you could only use them if you were in the hospital. So each year when they were tired of work... they would check into the hospital for a few weeks of rest and relaxation.

    So a hospital room in Japan is basically a hotel room. When people are really sick they have family members come to the hospital to care for them (because the nurses assume everybody there was just on vacation).

  • JoeCapitalist2 Orem, UT
    Jan. 27, 2014 12:57 p.m.

    freedomingood: "Right, and republicans are so scared people will like it they tried to keep it from being funded after it was made a law. If they truly believed their own lies they would just watch and let it fail on it's own."

    The problem is that it can't "fail on it's own" if government is mandating that everyone purchase it at inflated prices even if it is a terrible product or face ever-increasing fines.

    If Democrats truly believed their own lies (that it is a great system that everyone wants) then they would make it stand on its own and let the free market work.

  • airnaut Everett, 00
    Jan. 27, 2014 12:34 p.m.

    I'm sure Bob Bennett's 1st very first car was a brand new, top of the line, Ferrari or Mercedes Benz too!

    But --
    For what American's are currently paying --
    we should be able to afford better than ANY Foreign job.

    Our "insurance" dealers are ripping us off!

  • atl134 Salt Lake City, UT
    Jan. 27, 2014 12:20 p.m.

    @Alfred
    "They live much healthier lives than Americans. "

    Actually... a study found that smokers and the obese really aren't any more expensive to the healthcare system. Why? They die earlier (not needing health insurance from ages 70-90 because you died at 69 certainly is cheaper) from things that tend to kill you faster on average, so it roughly evens things out.

    Comparing similar treatments/details from country to country yields radically different results/pricing. My one afternoon hospital stay cost around 1,500 just for the room/bed (the entire bill was 18,000 but thankfully I had insurance). My dad's hospital room part of his bill in Germany was roughly 1,000... for an entire week. It was barely more expensive than a hotel. His surgery itself was half the cost of what the same surgery would be in the US.

  • Tyler D Meridian, ID
    Jan. 27, 2014 12:17 p.m.

    @Roland Kayser – “I liked Bennett/Wyden better than I like Obamacare.”

    Me too… it was market oriented while recognizing (and addressing) the inherent market failures in the healthcare industry. It also had the virtue of decoupling health insurance from employment – a mistake most countries recognized decades ago (i.e., no silly Hobby Lobby lawsuits had we gone in this direction).

    The Senate lost a good Senator when Bob was tossed out in favor of ideology. He was the type of representative a Republic needs (since we all have day jobs and cannot possibly be thoroughly educated on all the issues) – a pragmatic leader who focused on results and could play nice with others.

    By their ideologically driven inaction and refusal to participate in the process, the Republicans are as responsible for Obamacare as anyone. We could have had a Lexus but instead we got a Ford… whether it will turn out to be a Mustang or a Pinto remains to be seen.

  • atl134 Salt Lake City, UT
    Jan. 27, 2014 12:13 p.m.

    @Alfred
    "where there were no lines to queue up in for help."

    I had to wait 6 weeks to see a specialist for my health issue a couple years ago.

  • JoeBlow Far East USA, SC
    Jan. 27, 2014 11:49 a.m.

    Invisible.

    That all sounds well and good. I would be happy to see insurance across state lines since that seems to be the main GOP health care solution.

    But, lets look at the bigger issue. Are mandates or the state line issue what causes the average, non c section childbirth to cost $30,000?

    Do we really want to let companies drop you for a pre existing condition?

    Is this what you honestly think causes a routine outpatient procedure to cost $25,000+?

    Have you ever tried to control your medical costs? Shop around for the best price?

    Do you sincerely think that losing medicare payment caps would save money?

    Rather than just stick with the party line, you should really think about it. Business is there to make money. When they streamline, it is to improve the bottom line, not to save the consumer money.

    We need to all drop the party "wisdom" and actually deal with the problem.

    I am a huge fan of capitalism, but the profits in health care are growing significantly and are on track to bankrupt this country.

  • Instereo Eureka, UT
    Jan. 27, 2014 11:07 a.m.

    The first time National Health Care was proposed was by the Democrat Harry Truman. The Republicans killed it then, and did everything they could when they were in charge to ignore the issues. If the USA would have put a law in place then, they would have been among the first in the world to have done so. But, since they didn't and as the world did put in place health care plans, the USA feel behind in both health services and in controlling health care costs. Just like in the 50's, the cars were big and expensive and eventually replaced with less expensive foreign models. It seems the problem today is that the GOP hasn't recognized the problem just like the car companies in the 50's and in an effort to catch up with the world the democrats filled in a vacuum. Can you imagine if in the 50's there would have been people who said since the cars are so big and expensive that we should go back to the horse and carriage.

  • Spangs Salt Lake City, UT
    Jan. 27, 2014 10:29 a.m.

    There was never any doubt that having the insurance and drug companies draft significant portions of the law was going to result in a ungainly and awkward parts of the Affordable Health Care Act. The ACA is, at best, poorly conceived, poorly written, poorly implemented.

    That said, we see before us a healthcare system better than what was there 2 years ago. It's a mangled step forward, but a step forward nevertheless.

  • Alfred Phoenix, AZ
    Jan. 27, 2014 10:16 a.m.

    @freedomingood:
    "The truth is Japan, Australia and Sweden to name a few already have and love their Obamacare like healthcare."

    They had no choice... nor does America, now.

    "They spend half as much as we do and get better healthcare."

    They live much healthier lives than Americans. And if they did need good care quick, they usually end up in the US where there were no lines to queue up in for help.

    Obamacare is a disaster in the making, strung together, from the looks of it so far, by a bunch of amateurs.

  • Invisible Hand Provo, UT
    Jan. 27, 2014 10:09 a.m.

    @JoeBlow: You asked for suggestions: give everyone a tax credit to buy health coverage in a free market. And by free market, I mean one without restrictions and mandates on what they cover, what it costs, how much money they can make, or where it can be sold (including across state lines). Those who want more expensive plans can dig into their own pockets and fund it. As Mr. Bennett implied, the collective wisdom of markets is far better than anything that a bureaucrat or politician could design.

  • wrz Phoenix, AZ
    Jan. 27, 2014 10:10 a.m.

    "The fines they will pay if they do so — assuming that such fines can actually be collected — are less than the premiums they would have paid."

    That won't last long. Obama sucked everyone in with the promise of $2,500 annual savings in health insurance premiums... with a small penalty (tax, per the Supreme Court) for failure to sign up. Well, over the next years going forward, that penalty will increase so that folks will go screaming to sign up. And if they don't sign up or voluntarily pay the penalty, the IRS will be on their doorstep to collect.

  • 2 bits Cottonwood Heights, UT
    Jan. 27, 2014 10:05 a.m.

    I'm just a little tired of politicians who think their job is "Marketing Department" at a big corporation (USA Corp). And we little people are just lab rats, or consumers to be dealt with and fleeced to keep the corporation going. Like it's their job to figure out what we want... and then give it to us (to keep us fat and happy). It's their job to LEAD. Not to just follow the polls.

    Sometimes leaders have to do what's tough (not what's popular). We don't have any leaders in Washington anymore who are willing to do what's "right", even if it's unpopular. Because all they care about is keeping the people happy and giving them what their demographic analysis, focus groups, and Gallop polling indicates the masses want (so they can keep getting elected).

    That's not how you lead.

    Somebody needs to figure out what the right thing to do is and do it... not what polls the best, or gets them the most votes in the next election.

  • Open Minded Mormon Everett, 00
    Jan. 27, 2014 9:06 a.m.

    The result is a health care version of a 1955 Pontiac. It’s large, expensive to own and maintain, and burdened with features many customers don’t want.

    ======

    Oh,
    and one other thing --

    We can always trade it in and upgrade later for one of those better built Socialist German or Japanese model Single Payer options later!

  • Open Minded Mormon Everett, 00
    Jan. 27, 2014 9:02 a.m.

    The result is a health care version of a 1955 Pontiac. It’s large, expensive to own and maintain, and burdened with features many customers don’t want.

    =========

    But,
    It let's face it,
    it SURE beats walking, now - don't it!

  • Hutterite American Fork, UT
    Jan. 27, 2014 8:54 a.m.

    People are scouring the wrecking yards and farm sales the world over to find parts to restore that old pontiac; those were the good old days.

  • JoeBlow Far East USA, SC
    Jan. 27, 2014 8:49 a.m.

    Thid.

    I am not defending Obamacare. But I KNOW that we the pre Obamacare status quo was not an option.

    Anyone can complain. That has been the GOP playbook for years now.

    What are your suggestions?

  • Thid Barker Victor, ID
    Jan. 27, 2014 8:11 a.m.

    Do any of you who are defending Obamacare know that the vast majority of people who even bothered to sign up under Obamacare opted for Medicaid? And why not? Its 100% taxpayer funded with no deductibles, no co-pays and no premiums! Therefore it appears the goals and hopes of Obamacare are being defeated by Medicaid competing with Obamacare! Why didn't we just expand Medicaid in the first place and avoid all the billions of taxpayer dollars wasted on Obamacare? Obamacare is the dumbest excuse for a solution to a problem ever forced on America. Period!

  • Roland Kayser Cottonwood Heights, UT
    Jan. 27, 2014 8:05 a.m.

    I liked Bennett/Wyden better than I like Obamacare. But Senator Bennett's party controlled the senate for 12 consecutive years and he was unable to convince his colleagues to pass it. So we had to move on to something different.

  • marxist Salt Lake City, UT
    Jan. 27, 2014 7:59 a.m.

    I've looked at Bennett's proposal. It looks good on the surface. But it is unlikely it would have been passed as proposed, especially if it threatened insurance companies' profits even the slightest. After the various lobbies were through with it, it would have looked a lot like Obamacare. For-profit insurance must be removed from health care. That's the problem with Obamacare and that would have been the problem with Bennett's proposal once worked over by the congress.

  • Twin Lights Louisville, KY
    Jan. 27, 2014 7:01 a.m.

    You mean a Republican and a Democrat trying to solve a problem together? Of course that was doomed Senator. Sadly, but certainly.

  • JoeBlow Far East USA, SC
    Jan. 27, 2014 6:30 a.m.

    The population is aging. Health care costs are skyrocketing.

    Any unbiased look must conclude that our biggest future federal deficit problem is medicare and medicaid.

    So, we have 3 choices.

    1) reduce medicare and medicaid benefits
    2) increase the funding (ie taxes) to pay for these services
    3) reduce the costs of providing these services.

    Does anyone disagree with that? If so, please explain.

    Part of the problem is that the businesses who provide these services have no incentive to reduce the costs. Their goal is to increase profits.

    Tell me. Which of the major healthcare pieces, besides the government has an interest in controlling costs?
    Hospitals? Nope
    Insurance companies? Not really
    Doctors? Not at all

    We can complain all we want about Obamacare. And there are tons of reasons to complain.

    But, the pre Obamacare status quo is unacceptable and unsustainable.

    Until people grasp THAT truth, we will not deal with the problem.

    Lets say the GOP was successful in killing Obamacare. Then what?

    If one looks honestly at the facts and the truth, they can only conclude that something must be done.

    Far too many think that reducing regulations will fix the problem.

    That is ludicrous.

  • freedomingood provo, Utah
    Jan. 27, 2014 3:44 a.m.

    Right, and republicans are so scared people will like it they tried to keep it from being funded after it was made a law.

    If they truly believed their own lies they would just watch and let it fail on it's own.

    The truth is Japan, Australia and Sweden to name a few already have and love their Obamacare like healthcare. They spend half as much as we do and get better healthcare. That should be enough to go on.