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Comments about ‘My view: Problematic policy from polls’

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Published: Thursday, Jan. 16 2014 12:00 a.m. MST

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Kalindra
Salt Lake City, Utah

Speaking of being uninformed on issues, the author if this piece seems extremely uniformed about the social impacts of not having a minimum wage. Perhaps he should study history as well as philosophy?

KJB1
Eugene, OR

More right wing whining. Just another Thursday at the DN.

Truthseeker
SLO, CA

"They do not harm individuals, and should thus not be subject to government control."

That's very debatable. One would think a philosophy professor might see that.

Spangs
Salt Lake City, UT

I am crying again. There is NO data showing that increasing the minimum wage would decrease the number of jobs. In fact, many believe that the opposite would happen. Why? Because poor people spend! They spend all their money because they have to. You know who doesn't spend? The hoarding 1% who is supposed to be taking their money and stimulating the economy with new businesses.

2 bit
Cottonwood Heights, UT

Kalindra,
Did you even bother to read the article?

The article said nothing about "not having a minimum wage". Nobody has said anything about "not having a minimum wage".

#1. The discussion isn't about whether we have a minimum wage or not. We have had a minimum wage for many years.
#2. The discussion is about if increasing it actually helps society in the long run, and if we should be basing governing policy on media polls.

Seems like everybody so far is just posting standard partisan talking points they got from previous articles on the minimum wage. Is anybody going to comment on what's actually in THIS article?

===

What he actually said is... it's bad governance to base policy/laws (any policy, not just minimum wage) on media polls.

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I tend to agree that we should not be governing based on media polls.

#1. You can design a poll to end up with any result you want.
#2. Just because it's popular... doesn't mean it makes good governance.
If we ask school children if they want candy and ice cream for lunch... does that make it good governance?

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