Quantcast

Comments about ‘ValueSpeak: The man at the corner’

Return to article »

Published: Friday, Jan. 10 2014 1:10 p.m. MST

Comments
  • Oldest first
  • Newest first
  • Most recommended
george of the jungle
goshen, UT

But by the grace of God go I. I've heard that the faces and hands you meat on your way up the latter are the same ones you'll see on the way down. Give them your respects.

Danny Chipman
Lehi, UT

Great article. Thanks for the reminder that we need to treat all our brothers and sisters with kindness.

Juana DT
Provo, UT

We are all children of our Heavenly Father. This article underlines my feeling over the years that validation is as important as money (perhaps even more so). A few years ago I faced the quandary of ignoring "people on the corner" and not wanting to support their possible addictions. Like Mark, I felt inspired to start asking their names and as I repeated their name told them I would pray for them. This act of validation has proven time and again--to me as well as the person to whom I have spoken--that we are ALL truly connected. It has helped me become less judgmental. I cannot know another's circumstance. All I do know is that we are brothers and sisters!

valiant
Salt Lake, UT

There are so many out reach programs who truly want to help so there is no reason why we should see anyone begging on the street. My heart goes out to anyone who feels that desperate to take from those who are doing their best. I have extended myself with a hello and there have been times I have been treated unkindly because I don't have change. i don't think your helping those holding a sign by giving them money because you're validating what they are doing. When I see the corner empty, I am grateful they decided to get the help they need.

sunbean72
orem, UT

This is very nice, but I think somewhat idealistic. And maybe even dangerous. Didn't Elizabeth Smart's parents talk to a panhandler and offer them a job? Yeah, he ended up kidnapping and raping their daughter for nine months. I know he wasn't mentally ill (according to the courts), but many, many homeless people struggle with mental illness. And a recent KSL article followed several panhandlers and NONE of them were in the dire straights they pretended to be and many of them were criminals. I'm not saying we shouldn't treat people with love and respect, I'm just saying, you better be careful, very very careful, when you approach someone in that way.

to comment

DeseretNews.com encourages a civil dialogue among its readers. We welcome your thoughtful comments.
About comments