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Comments about ‘Does U.S. approach to truants, runaways do more harm than good?’

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Published: Friday, Dec. 27 2013 9:15 a.m. MST

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mssr
Provo, UT

America: Land of the Incarcerated.

Contrariuserer
mid-state, TN

Why do we have such an overwhelming predisposition towards retribution in this country?

These kids don't need jail time -- they need TREATMENT.

Don't punish the kids, HELP the kids!

Howard Beal
Provo, UT

Any "incarceration" should be work or service based, not behind bars. Give them treatment and education to go along with a strong work program. I agree with the posters above.

Bob Pomeroy
Bisbee, AZ

I find the idea that there is a 'one size fits all' solution being sought. While the difficulties are on-going, I think an assessment of problems in a broader sense, and of the resources which might be available. child molestation and incest are more prevalent than we would like to admit. boredom with schools that essentially just dumb kids down is a huge problem. I hate the idea of the state getting these kids on their list, but it is a bigger problem than private organizations have been able or willing to meet. I remember how meaningful the kind words of Harvey Taylor and J Elliott Cameron meant to me when I was a lad. Maybe we could teach adults to express the kind of agape which needs to be more prevalent -- social missionaries to troubled kids or something.

kargirl
Sacramento, CA

Common sense and effectiveness don't always come with people with letters behind their names and a pile of degrees in something. When putting together a solution for a child or for a group of children, let the interviews include videos with the perspective people interacting with children to see how they behave "in the field". The best people to work with these children and help them, might be the ones who think they aren't qualified, but love the children, the work, and have the heart for it.

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