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Comments about ‘In our opinion: Nevada judge gets it right in water dispute with Utah’

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Published: Tuesday, Dec. 17 2013 12:00 a.m. MST

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Ranch
Here, UT

Agreed. See, DN, liberals and conservatives *can* agree on some issues.

cjb
Bountiful, UT

Given the fact they won't have enough water without harming the water rights of others, they ought to consider migrating away from lawns and towards native plants on their lawns. That alone would probably fix their water problem.

Happy Valley Heretic
Orem, UT

@cjb.
I'm no fan of Vegas, but truth be told they are one of the most advanced water users/recyclers in the US, and actually return water to the Colorado.

Problem is there are too many people where the resources to supply those people simple don't exist.

Utah is going this same direction as we continue to build willy nilly in dry places like Tickville, now Eagle Mountain and landscape like we live in Washington State.

The Judge made the right decision.

brightness
Taylorsville, UT

Without adequate rain and snowfall in the proposed pumping areas to recharge the groundwater being pumped away will result in irreparable environmental destruction. The judge's decision is correct. To pump away water from area without scientific information (recharge should equal discharge) is being ignorant and not in the public's interest and sets a very bad precedent for others to follow and jeopardizes the teaching of science.

PatConniff
St. George, UT

The governor was foolish to veto the agreement with Nevada, which was hailed by both West Desert ranchers and environmentalists, and it could jeopardize Utah's own aims on the Colorado River, according to critics in the water-development community. By failing to cooperate with an important neighbor, Utah could sacrifice a positive tradition of bi-state cooperation and invite trouble as it seeks to divert some of the Colorado to feed its own growing desert metropolis.

Conservationists say such an arrangement would make Utah money and help solve Las Vegas' water woes without developing a destructive groundwater pumping scheme. In the mid-1990s, Utah's then-Gov. Mike Leavitt proposed as much, but the idea did not get much traction among policy makers.

That's narrow-mindedness.

PatConniff
St. George, UT

The Governor should have agreed to the deal. Conservationists say such an arrangement would make Utah money and help solve Las Vegas' water woes without developing a destructive groundwater pumping scheme. In the mid-1990s, Utah's then-Gov. Mike Leavitt proposed as much, but the idea did not get much traction among policy makers.

That's narrow-mindedness, and unfortunate for all involved.

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