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Comments about ‘What I learned about financial independence as a Mormon missionary’

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Published: Saturday, Nov. 23 2013 9:00 a.m. MST

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fani
wj, UT

What a great lesson to learn, financial independence- that does not mean you have to have a tonn of money, it mean for the individual to be able to take care his/her own needs without relying on anyone else such as government programs. It also means you can't spend more than what you take in. If only our government and politicians can live by this principle, we'll be better of

CT98
Saint George, UT

Good article. We need more people like you with your perspective. Dave Ramsey also teaches great financial literacy. Your debt question you pose on your blog has already been answered by Dave; I would highly recommend reviewing Dave's information.

David
Centerville, UT

My wife and I have gone through the Dave Ramsey classes. They gave us vision, direction, and attainable steps we could take to change our lives.

Financial freedom from debt requires a consistent, daily effort. Once debt is all paid off, it requires continued discipline to maintain the trajectory of saving and helping others.

But the effort is worth it.

marxist
Salt Lake City, UT

" It also means you can't spend more than what you take in. If only our government and politicians can live by this principle, we'll be better off." So...to get the funds to bail out the banking system the government should not have borrowed to get those funds, it should have taxed to get them?" I doubt you get the drift of what I am saying.

Sasha Pachev
Provo, UT

Those are good things to learn on your mission, but we would do much better if they were taught and learned in the home prior to that. We need to raise our young men so that it does not take a mission for them to start taking life seriously - they need to be at that point before they go.

XelaDave
Salem, UT

The real take away is that your mother and father paid for it. Perhaps if you had been taught to save and earn it first you would not have had to learn it on a mission an could have gotten on with learning even more. I hear people all the time in my area feeling guilty that they are not paying for their kids mission and their kids had to work to make it happen. Mt response is usually one of a gaping open mouth that this is now where we have arrived with missionary service. Guilty feeling parents for not paying for it all. Sad

utah cornhusker
NORFOLK, NE

I was a,convert and saved as much money as I could. If was difficult because as much as I saved a lot of it was spent at the mtc. My mission was cheap and friends which I am grateful for helped.

higv
Dietrich, ID

In the mission field you get the same allotment. I knew many budget impaired missionaries wondering when money would come in and wanted to leech off comps violation of mission rules. If you learn to budget will be ok.

george of the jungle
goshen, UT

One day at a time. The object is to know what the objects you are paying for.

brluthi
Provo, UT

@XelaDave I agree that parents paying for a mission shouldn't be an expectation and that parents need to teach their kids to save, but everyone has different goals. My dad didn't get to serve a mission when he was younger so he wanted to make sure money wasn't a problem for us when it was time for us to go. He still taught us how to save, though, and I had enough money saved up to buy my first car with cash and to pay my first semester of tuition at BYU.

dotGone
Puyallup, WA

Sure it would be good to learn all this before going on a mission, before marrying, before having kids, before launching in life, but the important thing is to learn what we need to know. It's not quite so important when and how, but that we learn. I am still learning things that many people learn much earlier in life. I've had to accept that the important thing is that we learn.

Boilerup
SOUTHAVEN, MS

"I doubt you get the gist of what I am saying." True capitalism would have allowed the banks to fail - no bailout should have occurred (whether it was from taxes or from debt). No bailout would've meant that lots of people who owe variable interest rates would've been in a difficult situation - THAT would truly teach many Americans how to budget! Personally, I'd have LOVED to have seen NO bailout occur for ANYONE!

Petra
Sanpete County, UT

It's very discouraging to see a missionary's sacred experiences being framed in a political way. Sorry, Deseret News, I would have never thought it of you.

OlderGreg
USA, CA

The cultural missionary dinner calendar is *not* about feeding poor starving missionaries. It is about having them in our home, personal contact, to exercise the mantle of their calling (which is a combination of them sharing blessings and us "sustaining them in their calling" by taking heed to what they have to say to us regarding the work)

Handing them a packed meal or a BK/MD/Polar/KFC/etc gift card is not the right thing. Do whatever is necessary to get them in your home, like set another place for the required (and invited) chaperone, adjust your schedule, make the courtesy "sorry - reschedule" call ---

bricha
lehi, ut

Sasha Pachev,

I disagree, while I think there should always be an emphasis on preparing these young men to serve, we have to realize that these young men grow their adversity and struggles, and that there is no way to "fully" prepare them for that, nor do I think that would be the point. It would be sad to see a missionary serve his time and come back the same person because he was "fully prepared" the mission allows us to stretch in ways that we never thought we could, and rely on the Lord more than we had ever needed to before.

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