Quantcast

Comments about ‘Defending the Faith: Three deaths, five decades ago’

Return to article »

Published: Thursday, Nov. 21 2013 5:00 a.m. MST

Comments
  • Oldest first
  • Newest first
  • Most recommended
george of the jungle
goshen, UT

I can only imagine, a Philosopher a Christian and a self centered mind altered drug user together. If I was there I could get something from each of them, but I don't think they would.

C Shields
c, CA

Eloquent, and informative, writing! Thanks for sharing a view into these great men's lives and philosophies.

Abbygirl
East Carbon, UT

I remember vividly the day Kennedy was killed, I was in the 5th grade in my last class before lunch. They announced it over the intercom.. I remember running home from school crying.. I remember my grandmother coming to the door and asking me what was wrong, she had not heard the sad news. I remember crying even harder when MLK was murdered! The two saddest days I can remember in my life.. I can't wait to hear on judgement day of what really happened to these two fine men!

patriot
Cedar Hills, UT

JFK was a great leader. How I wish we had a leader in the White House today.So much for wishing. As far as the assassination goes I just can't believe this was a single man job. There had to be two shooters involved simply because there is no way a man could shoot a bolt action rifle from that distance from that angel and a moving target too boot and all in 5 seconds time (three shots fired). Even using a semi-auto rifle would have been a real challenge. As a life long big game hunter with bolt action rifles I just can't believe one man was involved. My guess is there was a second shooter in the same building...perhaps on top.

Mike Richards
South Jordan, Utah

Excellent article. Of the three men mentioned, I wonder which has had the most influence on the individual? Huxley is almost a stranger to me. He was required reading in high school, so I remember reading "Brave New World", but that book didn't resonate with me. Some might think that President Kennedy has had the greatest influence. I would agree that he is held in very high regard by many people world-wide, but I would think that C. S. Lewis has influenced more people to reflect on their lives and to make the changes necessary to their thinking and behavior that would allow them to experience true joy and happiness. C. S. Lewis is one of my favorite authors. Just as the passage quoted shows his ability to get us to focus on the worth of a soul, much of his writing inspires us to think beyond the moment and to think of the possibilities.

Tyler D
Meridian, ID

It does a great disservice to Huxley to focus on his drug use – something he did for spiritual reasons only relatively late in his late. And he would have been horrified by the 60’s drug culture.

He was one of the towering figures of the 20th century and one of the most intelligent men who ever lived – no small statement when you consider that he was tasked with updating the Encyclopedia Britannica.

And his knowledge of world religions was, well… encyclopedic. Further, he was a greatly believer (I think justifiably so given his talents) in the common core of the world’s religious traditions, notably when they went beyond dogma & doctrine and towards pure (i.e., uninterpreted) religious experience.

His classic The Perennial Philosophy is a masterpiece and should be read by anyone who would claim a deep understanding of religion.

The Scientist
Provo, UT

I have to agree with TD. The Perennial Philosophy makes other religious works (including the most widely used scriptural canons) appear like amateur comic books by comparison.

Jamescmeyer
Midwest City, USA, OK

That paragraph about our nature and potential as human beings... Did CS Lewis really write that? I've kind of admired him off-hand for his influences in writing, but maybe it's time I take up some of his works and study.

The Scientist
Provo, UT

I also find it puzzling that LDS apologists should so much admire the work of CS Lewis - as mystical a Trinitarian as there ever was! If you do not see or understand the "trinitarian mystery" in CS Lewis' works, then you cannot understand CS Lewis. Any CS Lewis ideas and quotes that LDS admirers like can only be liked because of complete and utter misunderstanding.

coltakashi
Richland, WA

The quoted passage from Lewis is not the only one where he discourses on theosis, the ancient Christian doctrine preserved in the Eastern Orthodox churches that salvation consists of being raised into godlike beings as we are reconciled to God. The fact of Lewis' trinitarian belief does not in any way deprive Latter-day Saints of the opportunity to agree with many of the other insights he expressed about the nature of Christ, Satan, and eternity. I have heard Mormons who knew Lewis personally speak about this.

Tom in MS
Madison, MS

Mr. Peterson, your experience in California finding out about JFK was eerily similar to my experience in California. We heard about it on the playground at lunch, and then our principal came in and told our teacher. When he left and closed the door she bowed her head and sobbed. It is the only time before or since that I have observed an educator in such a state. It was a sad time. I remember that Monday (the day of the funeral) everything was closed, much like Christmas. Our entire family gathered around our small TV set to witness the proceedings. That has stuck with me my entire life.

bandersen
Saint George, UT

The scientist: Religious canon "amateur comic books". Really? Perhaps a little deeper study of those works would help you re-evaluate that statement. Not even Aldous Huxley would be so bold as to make that statement. But, he was just Aldous Huxley. It sounds like we have someone a step higher.

jeanie
orem, UT

The admiration of C.S. Lewis by LDS people is not ignorance, but rather an acknowledgement that we don't need to agree on everything to to find people or their beliefs admirable. THIS is the concept that is completely misunderstood by some.

Another trinitarian and Christian (and Catholic) apologist who had a tremendous influence on C.S. Lewis was G. K. Chesterton, another admirable atheist turned Christian thinker. Lewis has said that Chesterton's book Everlasting Man was the second book, next to the scriptures, that convinced him (Lewis) to become Christian.

Clifton Palmer McLendon
Gilmer, TX

All this ballyhoo about the fiftieth anniversary of President Kennedy's assassination. Nothing at all was said in 1950 about the fiftieth anniversary of President McKinley's assassination.

I lived in the San Francisco Bay Area from 1963 to 1966. Plenty of people said that the State of Texas was to blame for President Kennedy's assassination. Five years later, nobody blamed the State of California for his brother's assassination.

Verdad
Orem, UT

"The Scientist's" claim that "'The Perennial Philosophy' makes other religious works (including the most widely used scriptural canons) appear like amateur comic books by comparison" is not one with which the author of "The Perennial Philosophy" would have agreed. Not even close. Aldous Huxley respected the world's spiritual traditions and scriptures.

As to "The Scientist's" claim about C. S. Lewis, it's striking -- but by no means unusual, as the same phenomenon appears in very many other Christian authors -- how small and limited a role specifically Trinitarian theology plays in Lewis's works. There's no wonder at all in the fact that discerning and informed Mormons can and do like Lewis's writing so much despite his orthodox Trinitarianism.

Semi-Strong
Louisville, KY

The Scientist,

It's not just apologists that like Lewis. Many LDS do.

And we totally get that he was a Trinitarian (like most non-LDS Christians). But that doesn't mean we can't appreciate his other insights.

Do you agree with every single word or thought of those you admire?

sharrona
layton, UT

RE: C.S. Lewis ,“Longing for God”.

The idea of God in some minds does not contain, not a mere abstract definition, but real imaginative perception of goodness and beauty, beyond their own resources and this not only in minds which already believe in God. It certainly seems to me that the ‘vague something’ which has been suggested to one’s mind as desirable ,all one’s life even in such ostensibly irreligious forms as the land east of the Sun and west of the Moon in Morris ,and which arouses desires that no finite object even pretends to satisfy, can be argued not to be any product of own imagination."
In other words, the sense of desire that no finite object even pretends to satisfy to a real human need.
A great theme of Christian thinking about the origin and goal of human nature.

For in him we live and move and have our Being...(Acts 17:28)Creation is dependent on God for it’s very existence. “You have made us for yourself,

O Lord, and our hearts are restless until they find rest in you,” St. Augustine.

BH
Tremonton, UT

While of these three men, C.S. Lewis would be the one I most admire and respect, and have learned the most from his words, I could not say that he has impacted my life the most.

There is no question that our time has been shaped by actions of JFK while in office. The American people have a very unique relationship with Cuba, that has taken it's form almost exclusively because of the Bay of Pigs, and subsequent events including the Cuban Missile Crisis. Immigration from Cuba to the USA is shaped by these events.

Arguably, the decisions of President Nixon, to allow the events at the Watergate, were at least partly because Nixon had not forgotten the dirty politics of JFK and his daddy, several years earlier when he lost to JFK. Nixon had no intention to ever allow a political adversary to to to him, what the Kennedy's did to him.

These events, and all those that followed, have most assuredly shaped the country we live in now.

sharrona
layton, UT

RE: C.S. Lewis ,
“Longing for God”. The idea of God in some minds does not contain, not a mere abstract definition, but real imaginative perception of goodness and beauty, beyond their own resources and this not only in minds which already believe in God. It certainly seems to me that the ‘vague something’ which has been suggested to one’s mind as desirable ,all one’s life even in such ostensibly irreligious forms as the land east of the Sun and west of the Moon in Morris ,and which arouses desires that no finite object even pretends to satisfy, can be argued not to be any product of own imagination.

In other words, the sense of desire that no finite object even pretends to satisfy to a real human need. A great theme of Christian thinking about the origin and goal of human nature.

For in him we live and move and have our Being...(Acts 17:28)Creation is dependent on God for it’s very existence.

“You have made us for yourself, O Lord, and our hearts are restless until they find rest in you,” St. Augustine

antodav
TAMPA, FL

I would mourn C.S. Lewis and Adolus Huxley, authors of some of my favorite books (including my absolute favorite, Brave New World, which is almost prophetic in the way that it depicts the morally degenerate and dehumanized society of the future) far more than I would John F. Kennedy. Kennedy is one of the most overrated politicians in American history and it is doubtful that if he had lived he would have remained as idolized as he has been in death. His policies were disastrous, his personal morality was virtually nonexistent, and his legacy is entirely a fiction concocted by liberal historians and the media.

But by all means, let us continue to idolize "Camelot" ad nauseam anyway.

to comment

DeseretNews.com encourages a civil dialogue among its readers. We welcome your thoughtful comments.
About comments