Comments about ‘Committee supports bill to help electric vehicle owners’

Return to article »

Published: Wednesday, Nov. 20 2013 12:29 p.m. MST

Comments
  • Oldest first
  • Newest first
  • Most recommended
Liberal Ted
Salt Lake City, UT

They need to tax these vehicles, to compensate the loss of taxes when they're not consuming fuel. Let's throw that into the bill also:)

Curt Conklin
Provo, UT

Liberal Ted, your prematurely right. Eventually e-charging stations would have have to include tax in passing on their costs to the user/consumer, but right now it is premature. A tax now would just discourage purchase and use of EV's . . . much to the detriment of Utah's non-existent clean air. To have to figure out lost revenue for road maintenance and construction is a problem I'd love for us to have, because it means less carbon is being pumped into the air and also less reliance on foreign oil, less drilling in Utah's sensitive and beautiful rural areas. We need to look at how Japan is handling the issue. There are charging stations literally "everywhere" and EV's are in fact, quite common.

Liberal Ted
Salt Lake City, UT

@ Curt Conklin

I would have to see the actual numbers of the pollutants being released. Where do you think electricity comes from? Most of our power is generated by coal power plants. Solar power is very inefficient and only good during the day, we are allowed to build only so many dams, we could fill the entire state with wind mills.....the fact is these vehicles still pollute and they pollute in great quantity and costs us even more to finance.

The key is to find an actual clean energy source that is more reliable and cheap as petroleum products. Instead of investing in that research; politicians fill the pockets of oil and "green" companies that they seem to all have stock in.

Where do you think Al Gore got all of his money from? You drum up business by declaring "global warming, global cooling, climate change" then you sell them the "solution". Of which the companies have collapsed after taxpayer dollars filled their pockets.

Liberal Ted
Salt Lake City, UT

Tax bicycles, tax EV's, tax green energy. They're getting a free ride off of the poor.

How many middle class down to the poor can afford EV's? Yep they get stuck paying the taxes on the oil they consume to pay for the roads that the rich drive on in their EV's (which the rich get government stimulus to purchase the vehicle, a tax break for owning it, a tax break at the pump, and free power from stations."

But don't worry peasants the air is fresh and clean for the rich that get to play in it and fly their jets to vacation destinations.

If you dare to complain or say a word you will be labeled either a "bigot" "liar" "racists" "stupid" so on and so forth. These are the code words that the wealthy like to use to keep you down.

Yanquetino
Ivins, UT

@Liberal Ted:

Since you asked for data, I can provide some answers using the EPA stats for our NWPP utility region. If you drive 40 miles per day, and your current gas car gets 25 mpg, here is a comparison of the greenhouse gases produced:

Your car: 39.18 lbs.
Honda Civic CNG: 30.42 lbs.
Nissan LEAF EV: 11.46 lbs.

The above amounts include BOTH upstream (refining, fracking, electricity generation, etc.) AND tailpipe emissions.

As for cost, I think you will find that electric vehicles are now well within the price range of most middle-class families. For example, the LEAF now costs thousands less than I paid for my Subaru 9 years ago.

I hope this helps.

Open Minded Mormon
Everett, 00

I wish the government would either --

A. Stop the $25 billion annual subsidiez to Gas and Oil companies.
or
B. Offer the same amount of annual subsides to EV's and alternative energy rources.

The problem is:
Republicans will NEVER go along with plan A.
and, try as they might,
Democrats will NEVER get the Republicans to go along with either plan A or B.

VST
Bountiful, UT

An all-electric Nissan Leaf’s driving range is 75 miles and takes about 7 hours to recharge from a home 240 volt source. Fine for short-distance trips, but not very appealing for those long-range commuting and vacation drives.

As for the price of a Nissan Leaf: About 34K before taxes and licensing – might be a little bit too pricey for the average Utah family. However, there is a good payback when it comes to recharging from home – about $2.50 per recharge.

But the long-term king for the cost-efficient/lower-polluting vehicles will remain to be the hybrids – no limitations on driving range (>250 miles) or recharging time. But they do cost more to operate.

to comment

DeseretNews.com encourages a civil dialogue among its readers. We welcome your thoughtful comments.
About comments