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Comments about ‘How the Mormon mission age change is affecting female college athletes’

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Published: Thursday, Oct. 17 2013 8:00 a.m. MDT

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DHuber
Palmyra, NY

Now we have 19 year old girls who 13 months ago "had no desire to serve". Great. So they can now squeeze this in in their life plans of college or possible marriage. How Lucky for us. Compare that to a young man that has at least had some desire his whole life and everyone including his parent have prepared for. My son is on his mission now. He looked forward his whole life for this opportunity to serve. He earned the $11,000+ all himself. He went to several different years of missionary preparation classes. He studied spanish for 6 years in school and was called to Peru. So lets compare his preparations to the thousands of young women who sign up on a whim and a prayer hoping somehow they can handle it.

Shawnm750
West Jordan, UT

@DHuber - "So lets compare his preparations to the thousands of young women who sign up on a whim and a prayer hoping somehow they can handle it."

You know, everyone prepares themselves differently to serve a mission. For some it's a long process, for others it's not. I knew missionaries who had grown up in the church, and had over time built up a strong foundation in the gospel, and were truly dedicated to their calling. I also knew missionaries who were converts and had left on a mission within two years of joining the church, and they too were some of the hardest working missionaries I've ever known. There are really only two requirements for missionaries: 1) You have to have a desire to serve; 2) You are worthy to serve.

I admire your son for the amount of preparation he's done, and you for helping him get there. But it's not for us to question the qualifications of those whose desire to serve may only have been more recently realized than that of others.

Twin Lights
Louisville, KY

I know both Elders and Sisters who experienced a change of heart (based on many factors) that caused them to change course and serve a mission. It doesn't make them bad missionaries. The key is whether they are faithful and diligent. Sometimes their different experience/background is important to the people they teach.

From the Sisters in my mission in South America over 30 years ago to the Sisters I see in my ward today, these are generally excellent young women of the highest caliber. They are a welcome addition to the mission field.

Monk
Pleasant Grove, UT

@DHuber - I will not make your unnecessary comparison, thanks. Your comment has no bearing whatsoever to the article. There is a whole group of extraordinary potential Elders and Sisters that have been prepared from the time they were little to serve missions. They may not have realized it, but they have been prepared. Some have chosen to go. Some have chosen other paths (that are still worthy and righteous).

Your missionary isn't any more prepared than any others. Money in the bank and education don't qualify you for blessings. The Lord will bless those whom he calls with the tools necessary, if they live worthily.

This is a good article about individuals who have a righteous desire to serve. Leave it at that.

Joe_Libertarian
San DIego, CA

I would prefer to see 19 year old children educating themselves and preparing to have useful lives than spending 2 years trying to tell people how to change *their* lives... when they really have no clue what life is yet.

Get an education, get a job, do the good work of taking care of a family, gaining understanding of how difficult life truly is... and THEN try to get people to improve their lives, their outlook, their acceptance of God.

It is truly disingenuous and arrogant for a child who is, frankly, ignorant, to try to tell people how to live their lives.

BeSmart
Cheyenne, WY

@Joe Libertarian
I went on a mission at 19 and this experience teaches you about life.
I helped improve lives by gathering wood, distibuting aid, teaching English, and explaining my belief in God.
I never told someone to change their life, I explained how mine had been influenced.
As a person who had a rough life growing up I think all people have a right to influence another's life if they think it can help another person.
If someone has a good doctor you tell them, if someone had a fun experience you share it, last but not least, if you believe in something that makes you happy and gives you hope you should be able to share it.
Talk to kids who are 19 and 20 it may surprise you their intelligence and understanding.

Eddie
Syracuse, UT

@ Joe,
Try telling that to the ten's of thousands of converts who listened to these kids who do not know anything! I know of many of them who are/were stalwarts in their towns who have been changed amidst ridicule and mocked for what they were doing. Having been partly responsible for the conversion of a Baptist Preacher in the Deep South I can tell you that the Spirit of God does work thru 19 and 20 year olds.

Semi-Strong
Louisville, KY

If the Church's mission program converted no one, it would be worthwhile for the benefits the missionaries receive.

If the Church's mission program was of no benefit to any missionary, it would be worthwhile for the many brought to know the gospel (including me and my spouse) and the other services rendered.

The fact that both sides are benefited is a huge bonus.

ImABeliever
Provo, UT

What would be really awesome is if people would stop being so cynical in this world and follow the prophet; and quit talking non-sense about the subject of age which should have been a
non-issue a long time ago.

pacnwmom
Vancouver, WA

Jessica Chatman is an inspiration in all aspects of her life and a blessing to all who have the privilege of knowing her! How beautiful to read a story about a young person who heeds the call of God IMMEDIATELY upon receiving it!

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