Comments about ‘Davison Cheney: The football players weren't the only ones sporting uplifting mantras on their shirts on Saturday’

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Published: Tuesday, Oct. 15 2013 9:25 a.m. MDT

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CWEB
Orem, UT

Curious...why can't Spirit Honor Tradition be on the shoulder of the sleeves for every game? Keeping the names is very important as I see it...but in smaller print on the shoulder would look pretty cool. But if you do it...don't EVER change it...BYU needs to learn what the word "tradition" means...and it means carefully considering what you want to be tradition, and then committing to it forever. That is tradition! aka: Hakka. Colors. etc.

MapleDon
Springville, UT

From a fan standpoint, the "Spirit Honor Tradition" shirts were frustrating. Who caught the ball? Spirit. Who made the tackle? Tradition.

Wear them to practice, but put the players' names on the jerseys going forward.

Brave Sir Robin
San Diego, CA

That was the silliest newspaper article ever. You guys call this journalism?

Steven S Jarvis
Orem, UT

I can't even remember the last time BYU played Virginia Tech. BYU did play Virginia this season though...

I personally loved the idea, but not the implementation of the spirit, tradition, honor mantra. Earn your name on your shirt. These jerseys should be used till that happens during spring ball and such.

I love the idea of putting the slogans on gloves or the shoulder. What is more important isn't seeing the words. It is being the words. Honor did that by returning and having a field day giving hugs to the opposing ball carriers.

Pipes
Salt Lake City, UT

Let's cut out the fluff and play football. Spirit, Honor and Tradition are about what you do on and off the field, not what you have on the back of your jersey. For a supposedly tough guy, Bronco is a little too touchy, feel-ly for my taste.

caleb in new york
Glen Cove, NY

a hilarious article that matched an odd uniform decision. I don't have a problem with the uniform name-removing experiment. Fans can adapt by carrying around a team roster and memorizing the players numbers. It'll help BYU fans increase in their memorization skill and brain power. Brains need exercise to stay strong.

NevadaCoug
Overton, NV

I second the criticism of the ESPN announcers. I got really tired of hearing about some kicker named "Arlano" that supposedly plays for BYU.

The inability to pronounce names when you are a sportscaster drives me bonkers. That should be a prerequisite for the job.

cal
Cedar Hills, UT

This was funny. It's like sports for normal people. I saw the same game, but not through these eyes. Thanks for the laugh, Cheney.

JD Tractor
Iowa City, IA

I didn't know that pushing negative stereotypes was still acceptavle journalism. How desperate was Cheney to be funny, snide or whatever this article is supposed to be? Hadley had "SPIRIT" on the back of his jersey. But why get the facts straight when you write for a newspaper, they just get in the way of faux-perceptions.

WisCoug
VERONA, WI

"From a fan standpoint, the "Spirit Honor Tradition" shirts were frustrating. Who caught the ball? Spirit. Who made the tackle? Tradition."

Here's a thought. Get a roster and learn the numbers. Note that this skill is useful even when the team HAS the names on the back, as sometimes you can only see the front or the names are too small to recognize.

I liked it in the same way that I like(d) it when other programs do similar things. Think Utah with their Wounded Warrior Camo Jerseys (Courage, Commitment, etc.) or AFA with their jerseys against Navy a couple years ago (Freedom and Service). It was a nice break from the norm; a nice way to emphasize the core values of the program, but I will be just as happy (and apparently so will the players) when things get back to normal.

Now, the real question is how do we get more games in the Royal Blue?

onebigdaddy
Dillon, CO

Put the players name back on the jersey - all of us don't know their number.

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