Comments about ‘How a father came to love the daughter with Down syndrome he wanted to abort (+video)’

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Published: Monday, Sept. 30 2013 6:45 p.m. MDT

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Nan BW
ELder, CO

I am glad he shared this story. I hope it will help someone else. All of us have some sort of hang-ups going into parenthood, and being willing to share how we overcome them is a great way of sharing the perils of being parents.

conservative scientist
Lindon, UT

Thanks for the beautiful story.

baddog
Cedar Rapids, IA

Our fifth child and fourth daughter was born with Down syndrome. We didn't have the "blessing" of knowing in advance the gender and situation of children then as we have now.

There is grieving for a time for the child not born and sadness for loss of the child that replaced her. She became a intregal part of our lives. She will be with us forever, on this earth or not. She has changed our family for the best.

Although she could live in a group home. we have chosen to have her with us. We delight in her moments of bringing clarity and love into our home. Her nieces and nephews love her unconditionally as she loves them.

I understand how a father can feel. Special needs children are sent her to serve as well as be served. They teach us real life lessons.

TRUTH
Salt Lake City, UT

Love and abortion are polar opposites....having a hard time reconciling the two and how that makes for a good father

Albert Maslar CPA (Retired)
Absecon, NJ

I see and talk to a mother in church with her down syndrome daughter and I see the love as the daughter takes her finger through words in the hymnal, and she sings along, not the voice that would get her on American idol, but it brings tears of happiness to my heart and I tell the little girl that God loves her song best of all. A beautiful thing is that these children will always need their parents love and their parents will always have them and need them no matter what.

Shawnm750
West Jordan, UT

@TRUTH - None of us are perfect. This man obviously failed to see the bigger picture and has since realized what it means to be a father and love unconditionally. From what it sounds like, he probably regrets considering that option every day of his life. He was obviously overwhelmed (and probably scared) of what raising a child with special needs meant. Who wouldn't be? He's human after all. But he moved past that, learned from his mistake and became a better person. That's what makes for a good father (and person.)

JSB
Sugar City, ID

My grandson has Down syndrome. He has blessed the lives of all who know him and opened my eyes to the potential for love that these wonderful people have. Thanks for this story.

CB
Salt Lake City, UT

There was a beautiful story by a mother whose child was born with Down Syndrome. It spoke of planning a trip to Italy but finding that you had instead landed in the Netherlands.
The scenes were different, but just as beautiful once you accepted that you were in the Netherlands and not in Italy.
I know of two families who have taken the daughters of those who would/could not accept their
disability. These children love and are loved and a blessing to these families, most especially
to their siblings. Witnessing over the years their interactions, patience, kindness and inclusion in all family activities has been a lesson in loving others as you love yourself.
Beautiful story, thank you for sharing in this age of so easily dumping what might cause inconveniences.

Kay The LDS
Lacey, WA

Such a heartwarming story. I'm glad that both parents of this beautiful little girl made the right decision. Though special needs children may come with more challenges, they certainly are very blessed.

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