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Comments about ‘What if the government shuts down and nobody notices?’

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Published: Monday, Sept. 30 2013 4:07 p.m. MDT

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UtahBlueDevil
Durham, NC

I wonder what the house would have done had the Senate sent over spending bill, with it a mandate for background checks on every weapon and ammo sell.... I wonder if the house would have considered that bill.... or offered to negotiate over the added on clause.

I am sure it would get the exact same consideration the House bill got. The last few attempts were... we'll agree to a budget if you cut off your arm.... or wont do that.... ok if you cut off your hand... we;ll pass a CR. The "compromises" were no compromise what so ever. Ok... instead of your wife... I take your daughter.... will that work for you?

No? Well lets have a conference to agree upon which family member we take....

Both sides are being silly.... both.

djc
Stansbury Park, Ut

You really don't think you will notice the loss of 40,000 weekly paychecks in Utah. I don't know what planet you are from, but in my world the effects will be felt relatively quickly. My normally bustling building has exactly 4 people working in it right now. Normally there are at least 100. That is 96 people who do not get a paycheck for today. If you don't think that will be felt at the grocery stores, fast food places, and other LOCAL businesses you are sadly misinformed. This shutdown will eventually effect every single resident of Utah and every other state. You talk of uninformed people, but then proceed to make uninformed arguments. One week of this shutdown will have an over $10 million dollar effect on the economy, just from paychecks. This doesn't even count lost tourist dollars. I wish I had my head so far in the sand that I couldn't see what is coming, but sadly I do have the ability to make reasonable rational decisions. It is a sad time.

dalefarr
South Jordan, Utah

The kind of juvenile "so what" thinking displayed in this editorial leads to the destructive behavior of our congressional representatives who for years have refused to construct and adopt a budget. Continued irresponsible congressional misbehavior puts our democracy (constitutional compound republic for the radical members of the GOP) at risk.

SG in SLC
Salt Lake City, UT

Well said, djc.

I have to shake my head at the naiveté of the folks here who think that shutting down the government is a *good* thing. It costs MONEY to mothball significant portions of the federal government, and then remobilize them again later; in the billions of dollars, I would think.

Government spending is a component of GDP, so every government dollar that would've been spent but is now sitting idle, thanks to the shutdown, is one less dollar of GDP growth. In real human terms, this is the many contractors and vendors who just had their government contracts and purchases deferred (or canceled). Truly, "money is like manure, of very little use except it be spread." There is also a multiplier-effect to slashing government spending via the shutdown. Hundreds of thousands of government employees just got furloughed, so their discretionary spending likely just took a nosedive (consumer spending is the largest component of GDP).

Taken together, you begin to see the impact on individuals and the economy that the shutdown will have; and this is small potatoes compared to what will happen if the same kind of shenanigans ensue with the debt ceiling.

one vote
Salt Lake City, UT

They are noticing, especially in the context of the attempt to defund already funded ACA.

Swiss
Price, Utah

No the 800,000 out 3,000,000 won't care; it's a paid vacation that doesn't count against their leave time. All seventeen times this has happened they have been fully paid when it was settled. Even when they were forced home for twenty one days they got full salary for that time.
The object is to get the media to chronicle how the public is inconvenienced. It has nothing to do with the debt until the US supposedly needs to sell bonds(raise the credit card limit) which Treasury says will happen on 17 October. Convenient timing but not proven to be a set up by the Secretary of the Treasury.

one vote
Salt Lake City, UT

What if we go back to 2008 credit and liquidation freeze? Bet you will notice then.

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