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Comments about ‘Jay Evensen: Union Football, Spencer Hadley: This is why sports can really matter’

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Published: Thursday, Sept. 26 2013 12:00 a.m. MDT

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Alaskn
Hooper, UT

You are right; just look at the San Fransisco 49's decision to allow Aldon Smith to play after being caught DUI and then sweep him away to the rehab.
Did his play help them win the game; no!
Will their decision positively impact current and future players; no again.
These kinds of decisions by sports organizations and coaches are partly whats wrong with the sports world. There is a sense that athletes are above the law, better than the rest, and should be treated differently.
If Aldon had been a police officer, would he have gone to work patrolling the streets as if nothing had happened? No! He would have been suspended pending investigation or if caught in another jurisdiction, likely jailed, bailed and appearing in court.
Why do the majority of schools, professional organizations etc, allow athletes to get away with this kind of behavior? It is no wonder a ref in Utah was killed by a punch from a player because he's seen that type of activity before by professional players and it's been allowed.
I commend BYU and the Roosevelt Coach for their decisions and wish there were more out there doing the same.

Rural sport fan
DUCHESNE, UT

What in the world is this about?

"Maybe Labrum and BYU Coach Bronco Mendenhall have started a movement that reaffirms the meaning of games and puts the philosophical discussion to rest."

Started a movement? Really? Maybe I'm sheltered, but I know for a fact that this movement has been ongoing for years. The fact that the various news media and social networks have grabbed these stories as if they are aberrations speaks more of their lack of knowledge of the real world most programs live in, than it does of the world of high school and BYU sports.

Kudos to the Union coaches for stepping up. And as usual, BYU stands by their standards. But how about a little credit for the many programs that never make the news, because they already have set their standards that high, and never make the news, because no one cares if a bunch of kids just act responsibly and honorably as a part of their every day life, because they already understand the responsibility that comes with wearing the uniform that represents their community?

What a slap in the face to those programs and kids.

Alaskn
Hooper, UT

Rural Sports Fan
while I agree that there are many programs that are and have been doing this for years, and BYU certainly has time and time again stuck by their honor code, it is refreshing to see these types of articles written as we both know it doesn't happen enough.
Although I think there is a chaning wind so to speak, San Franciscos handling of the DUI is a classic example of what is wrong with sports.
I could also mention Texas A&M and their handling of Manziel. What have they done, what did they do to try and help him?? Nothing really. It is more important to them and their program to have him on the field, than sitting on the bench to teach him a lesson. Unfortunately this is not a rare occurance, rather it is a regular one in the sports world.
And people wonder why athletes act the way they do. Is it the start of a movement; no. It has been going on in many programs quietly for a long time. But maybe it will lead to something more if the media takes it up and highlights it more often.

mohokat
Ogden, UT

Can anyone imagine Whittingham suspending one of his main players for anything just before a game with BYU?

Levin
Reno, NV

@RuralSportsFan, just in like the parable of the prodigal son, the kids and coaches who do everything right are entitled to all the benefits of participating in sports. When the prodigal returns, the faithful son can partake in the joy of redemption. As one whose sins are not publicized like, say, Spencer Hadley or KVN, I can feel glad to see them turning their lives around, and be encouraged to change mine in a more private way.

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