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Comments about ‘Governor Herbert announces $242M surplus in education funding’

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Published: Tuesday, Sept. 17 2013 4:56 p.m. MDT

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Zaruski
SLC, UT

Good to see surpluses being redirected to places where they are needed, instead of immediately announcing more massive tax cuts at the expense of those who need it most.

Props to the Guv.

Fitness Freak
Salt Lake City, UT

I will applaud the guv. IF he's able to put that 122m into education. But - he's not the only one who has something to say about the state's budget. The state legislature wants a new prison so their developer friends can take advantage of the 680 acres the prison sits on.

Anyone taking bets that education (where its needed) WON'T get all the money?

DN Subscriber 2
SLC, UT

Whoa! The governor is absolutely wrong to dump tine extra $122 million in the Legislature to spend as "one time" good deals.

This is overpayment by taxpayers, and should be returned to those who were overcharged.

No politician will ever tell you they have enough money, and will always find creative ways to spend every dollar they have access to. Too often, on pet projects that are little more than payoffs to supporters, or which they hope will result in their reelection.

It's not the Governor's or the Legislature's money, or even the school systems. It belongs to the TAXPAYERS!

worf
Mcallen, TX

Lower property taxes?

Orem Parent
Orem, UT

I'll gladly keep paying my taxes at the rates they are right now if the surplus can actually make it into the classroom or even into a small raise for the great teachers my kids have this year.

Education is EXACTLY where that money should be spent.

Baron Scarpia
Logan, UT

This money needs to go back to the taxpayers in the form of reduced taxes, especially those with large families who need tax relief the most.

squirt
Taylorsville, ut

Bruce Williams has no business telling the schools districts what they can and cannot use the money for. Baron, those with large families do not pay their fair share towards the school system despite their use of it. Are you suggesting that those who have no children should not pay into the school system?

worf
Mcallen, TX

Typical government.

Oh boy! Have money,--let's spend.

American education is the biggest scam in history, and people still want more.

Go figure.

Utexmom
Flower Mound, TX

Pay your teachers. Get higher quality teachers. Teach them better math skills.

JWB
Kaysville, UT

This would appear to be an election tactic for him and to pit him against the legislature, who always believes internally and externally that educators and education are evil in our state. No district leadership and teachers nor principals are good enough for the legislative body for the past 20 and more years. Public school officials and teachers don't deserve one dime extra except for a Number 2 pencil twice a year without a sharpener.

Any charter school, private school or home schooling is needed, in their mind, whether qualified nor able to fulfill the educational requirements of the federal and state.

It is a little dismaying to see how much the legislators can put on the UEA and NEA and believe that all teachers subscribe to anything those organizations state or do. The UEA is a good balance and since the legislature always lambastes the UEA, it doesn't appear to be as outgoing as it used to be. They appear to be in the background with all the alternative type of unproven education comes on line without any intrusion or questioning by the legislature. Non-educator business managers acting as principals is okay in Utah.

worf
Mcallen, TX

@Utexmom:

* efficient management would increase teacher pay.
* math is taught according to standardized test objectives, and provided teaching strategies.
* poor student math skills are not always the result of bad teachers, but on how they're made to teach through being micro-managed.
* if money was the answer, we would have the highest educated people in history.

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