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Comments about ‘How food stamps keep families in a cycle of poverty’

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Published: Friday, Sept. 6 2013 6:00 a.m. MDT

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UGradBYUfan
Snowflake, AZ

CPI and Liberal Ted
I agree that education should be pathway to upward mobility and financial independence, and financial aid would be a possible source of income for these families. But the problem with this pathway, is that the levels of funding for financial aid has not changed since the end of WWII or the beginning of the Korean conflict, and because of this huge financial downturn, "financial aid" has changed from grants, scholarships and work-study, to some federally subsidized loans, with much more unsubsidized and commercial loans, that require payment of interest accumulation as they go through school.

What makes matters worse is that there are an ever increasing population of unemployed, or under-employed college and trade school graduates with financial burdens that cannot be defaulted on.

The real drain on America and American tax-payers isn't the levels of funding for Federal food stamp programs ($85 billion nationally), but instead the corporate welfare ($ trillions internationally) that never seems to be addressed on either side of the political isle.

donquixote84721
Cedar City, UT

Give a man a fish and he will eat for one day, but teach him to fish and he will become self-reliant and keep his self-esteem

no fit in SG
St.George, Utah

Close down the food stamp program.
Dole out the money to starving corporations...
There, all better.

The Real Maverick
Orem, UT

Why is it horrible for a poor family of 5 to have kids but use food stamps but ok for families in this state to have 5+ kids but use tax exemptions? Aren't we both paying for their lack of accountability?

"Give a man a fish and he will eat for one day, but teach him to fish and he will become self-reliant and keep his self-esteem"

Why are these stereotypes so prevalent among conservatives? What evidence to they have to support these stereotypes?

Since 08, higher education has seen its largest increases in attendance in decades. Americans working 49+ hrs per week has doubled in recent years. Worker productivity has skyrocketed. Older Americans are working well into years that were typically retirement years. College grads are working for min wage because they're unable to find better employment. American families are spending less, going on fewer vacations, and working more.

With so much evidence to suggest that Americans are hard working yet just lacking opportunity why do conservatives insist that they're really just lazy and wanting a free lunch?

Americans want to fish. But the 1 percent has bought all the ponds and won't share.

The Real Maverick
Orem, UT

Lastly, the middle-class and American worker deserves everything that it gets. We spend so much time over-analyzing welfare and food stamps and rationalize for modern-day robber barons, Koch Bros, Waltons, Romneys, etc. If we ever hope to turn this economy around, we need to stop attacking police men, teachers, vets, retirees, students, women, minorities, and small business owners.

We need to stop giving away our wealth and freedom away to corporations and start DEMANDING equality. When we talk about the "rich" we are talking about big corporations who are taking away our salaries and benefits and awarding those at the top with millions. When they go bankrupt, the CEOs aren't held liable. The workers are. This is wrong.

As Americans, if we want to maintain our standard of living, our freedoms, and our capitalistic society, we need to stop supporting these types of garbage studies. We need to stop attacking each other. We must unite and fight for America. If we do not, we will see a feudal system in which 1 percent controls everything and the rest of us are turned into serfs.

Fight against stereotypes and fight for America.

Wonder
Provo, UT

Wow, there's a lot of envy of poor people in these comments. You can only hope that you get your wish and become just as poor as these people that you envy so much. Then you too will have all the "perks" of wondering how you're going to pay the rent, feed your family, etc.

ThornBirds
St.George, Utah

The fishing story?
Lovely thought.
However, reality has come forth to prove that unattainable in so many cases.
Simply think it through.

worf
Mcallen, TX

Two kinds of dependencies:

* on your self
* on government, or others

Twin Lights
Louisville, KY

Amazing.

Everyone jumped down this couple’s throat for saving for a house. But the article states they were “Putting some money aside for unexpected expenses and towards a down payment on a home . . .”

I thought having some money set aside for a rainy day seemed smart and more likely to help them get on their feet. Which, by the way, seemed to be the point of the article. That moderate savings should be encouraged to help the poor get on their feet rather than count against them. Obviously there have to be reasonable limits and those too are addressed.

Everyone thinks they are not cooking for themselves. Did I miss something in the article?

Commenters say they can easily live off of $400 per month or less. Great. But the average for a THRIFTY family of four is between $553 and $634 (depending on the age of the children). That about squares with my shopping experience.

worf
Mcallen, TX

An educated society wouldn't have the majority of its people begging for food, and welfare.

Hipmama
Salt Lake City, UT

If Jimmy and Melissa lost their benefits because of their tax return they need to be in touch with the Utah Department of Workforce Services, tax returns are specifically exempt as income for the purpose of SNAP/food stamp eligibility. They should lose benefits or eligibility entirely unless their income foes over 130% of poverty. But tax returns are not considered an asset even if they squirrel it away in savings. Which is exactly why they changed the rule, to encourage savings in low-income households. Had the reporter talked to DWS she would have found this out.

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