Comments about ‘Religious discrimination in the workplace increases with diversity’

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Published: Monday, Sept. 2 2013 7:00 a.m. MDT

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Frankness
TALLAHASSEE, FL

I was tempted to write my reaction to this piece, but nope I'm not.

Ranch
Here, UT

Poor picked on religious people. In nearly 40 years in the workplace, I have never seen discrimination against Christians. Never. I've seen other groups discriminated against though. And, btw, if your business is open on the Sabbath it isn't discrimination against you if you have to work on it (all the employees have to as well).

george of the jungle
goshen, UT

Simmer down, Stop stirring the pot.

Tekakaromatagi
Dammam, Saudi Arabia

My friend was Moslem and Friday prayers are important but his employer in Canada would not accomodate. I don't know how much of an accomodation would have been required. Would it have been to take an extra hour during lunch? Or to just not come in at all? I would agree with the former, but the latter would be a pretty big thing.

If an employer is willing to accomodate that, I would take that as a signal that the employer truly values diversity and that would make me feel more comfortable working for that employer. I can understand how that would increase morale.

no fit in SG
St.George, Utah

Wondering why people are discussing their religion, or lack of it at their place of employment.
People generally do not discuss, or have the opportunity or time to get into such personal discussions while "working".
Just try talking about the salary of each employee and watch what management does.
Sounds like the "Duck Dynasty" office. Too much free time?

Blue
Salt Lake City, UT

The act of _feeling_ persecuted, even when you're hugely in the majority and while simultaneously demanding the freedom to persecute others in the name of your own religion, is central to the world's major religious beliefs.

The ages-old conflict between reason and religion grinds on. Little by little, reason is prevailing, as it inevitably must.

The Scientist
Provo, UT

One of the largest religious discrimination cases in recent US history involved the systematic discrimination against persons who were NOT LDS by an LDS senior management team at a company headquartered in Arizona.

In Utah, such favoritism is winked at, but the discriminatory effects are felt throughout the community.

Mormons favoring fellow Mormons for jobs and promotions IS religious discrimination.

Truthseeker
SLO, CA

DN must have someone assigned to scan publications for the "war on religion" section of the paper.

What constitutes "persecution?"

My husband was at a work-associated dinner function of senior executives. A newly hired executive, first time meeting my husband, proceeded to pointedly grill him on specific beliefs of Mormons --such as Mormons believing they can become Gods etc. After responding to several questions my husband asked the executive if he was a "born-again" Christian," to which the executive took great offense, (and ended the conversation). A few minutes later the executive's wife then quietly told my husband, that "yes" they were "born-again" Christians.

Valjean
Los Alamos, NM

The notion of a religious majority being persecuted by a religious minority may seem ludicrous, but it's essentially the story of Syria, whose dictator belongs to a relatively minor branch of Islam and who has put fellow members of that sect in positions of authority. I don't think Syria is the only recent example, either.

Lagomorph
Salt Lake City, UT

The accompanying sidebar graphic has some lessons. Note that for both groups shown that show perceived bias against themselves rather than for others, the rate is higher than for their perception of bias against other groups. The parable of motes and beams applies. Human nature is revealed in a bar graph. It's a lot easier to see the speck in your own eye than the log in another's. Perhaps a sermon on the subject would be appropriate next Sunday at the evangelical churches. Also, note that the evangelicals seem much less likely than their colleagues to notice discrimination against other groups. Conversely, the atheists show a higher than average sensitivity to the plights of others. Would someone please explain the apparent difference in empathy between one group where charity is a cardinal virtue and another where it is not.

Oatmeal
Woods Cross, UT

Atheists discriminated against? Is it because of all of the religious holidays they want off?

Phranc
SALT LAKE CITY, UT

So my former boss wanted to start having a prayer before staff meetings I told he I would be fine with that as long as she would give me a minute to get sky clad since my pagan religion requires i do so before prayer, for some reason she decided against the prayers.

Jack
Aurora, CO

As much as I am loathe to say it, but I agree with Scientist. That's one of my "hot-button" issues, that members of my faith try to justify favoritism just because of a shared belief. it isn't right if members of another religion do it, so it isn't right when LDS members do it.

Stop it!

RedWings
CLEARFIELD, UT

A Scientist: "Mormons favoring fellow Mormons for jobs and promotions IS religious discrimination."

Absolutely true, but there is a difference between members' improper or ignorant behavior and the church's policies. The LDS Church does not teach its members to discriminate. I deal with fellow members' bad behavior, opinions, and conduct all the time. It has no affect on my belief in Jesus Christ or the Gospel. Ultimately religion is about a person's relationship with their Creator.

Criticizing individuals is one thing; generalizing it to a group or organization is called a stereotype, or "profiling".

I believe it was Elder Robert Hales who said, "Christ had a perfect church until He let us all in"...

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