Comments about ‘Gail Miller named co-chairwoman of Count My Vote initiative to change Utah's caucus, convention system’

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Published: Thursday, Aug. 29 2013 4:15 p.m. MDT

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Linus
Bountiful, UT

Choosing such a sympathetic public figure to co-chair this drive is unfortunate. The "Count My Vote" initiative should be re-named the "Count the Vote of the Uninformed" initiative. It is intended to blunt the influence of the passionate in favor of the apathetic sheep who are easily sold on a big spender. The initiative springs from the fall of one of Utah's career politicians, Senator Bennett, who intended to be a "lifer" just like Grandpa Orrin.

The Founders didn't intend for government service to become a career. If you have misgivings about career, divine-right politicians, don't be swayed by the recruitment of Gail Miller to give credibility to this misguided initiative.

Reasonable Person
Layton, UT

Good move!

Utah's caucus system is designed to limit true voter participation by gorging the meetings with insiders and activists.

The person calling the average voter "uninformed" might be correct, since the "average Utah voter" only knows the letter R and blindly punches that button.

Hopefully, with citizen-driven primaries, people will have to start paying attention to what they vote for.

Or else we'll have more Mike Lees.

Utah_1
Salt Lake City, UT

The caucus & convention system in Utah is the best way to make sure a grassroots process can win over large amounts of money. It is the only way someone with $100,000 can go against someone with $2 million in election funds.

We have a system that that does NOT favor the incumbent, wealthy or famous. This is a good thing.

Our problem with voter turnout is it has not kept up with the population increase. The voter turnout keeps going up but not as fast as the population. Some of that is the younger voters, where Utah has a larger percentage of them and they aren't, as a group, as involved. Also those moving in and not understanding our system.

We already have a "bypass" system, filing as an unaffiliated candidate. You go straight to the general. Someone doesn't think they can win if vetted by average citizens asking one on one questions, can run and spend the money. Why should they be a party nominee if they are going to bypass the party?

If you change the way our Utah primary's work, you could have two republicans in the general election ballot (or two democrats).

Utah_1
Salt Lake City, UT

I am sure Gail is a nice lady. That doesn't mean she is correct to change the system.

Who gets to pick the people that show up on the ballot? It is the voters through the caucus system. The candidates get to decide if they are going to run and each of us vote to have them vetted. We put the best ones we have that volunteered to run on the ballot. One of the reasons we get involved in the caucus system is to have a say as to who is on the ballot.

If we didn't have the system we have, it would be the power brokers that would get to decide. They are the ones trying to get rid of the caucus. Sad she bought into their argument.

Keep Fair Elections in Utah, keep the caucus and convention system

Utah_1
Salt Lake City, UT

"Reasonable Person":

re: Sen. Bennett in 2010. He was not in the top 2 coming out of convention. In fact the more moderate Tim Bridgewater was selected by 57% of the delegates in the last round. Mike Lee managed to get 43% and make it to a primary. Sen. Bennett endorsed Tim Bridgewater during the primary, but with voters ticked at TARP and ObamaCare, they went with Mike Lee.

You like or don't like Sen. Mike Lee? Well 57% of the delegates didn't pick him to be the nominee. It was during the primary he was selected to be the GOP nominee.

Limiting? There were over 120,000 voters that participated in the 2012 Neighborhood Caucus election and meeting. The democratic caucus also had record turnout. People want a say on who shows up on the ballot.

The open primary is working so well in 2013 where 15% was considered good? You can't blame that on the caucus system. The one time Utah got rid of the caucus system our turnout went to 10% for a primary that included the US Senate. It was even that low in Salt Lake County. See August of 1946.

ClarkHippo
Tooele, UT

@Reasonable Person

In your opinion, what percentage of Utah voters are the "average Utah voter?" The ones whom you describe as only knowing, "...the letter R and blindly punches that button."

Obviously, there is at least a pretty good section of voters in Salt Lake County, as well as among those who live in Utah's 4th Congressional District who are not "average Utah voters."

Otherwise, how did Jim Matheson get re-elected to Congress and Ben McAdams (who as a State Senator had one of the most liberal voting records in the legislature) get elected Salt Lake County Mayor?

Cougar11
Highland, UT

This system has to change. Packing a room shouldn't allow you to win at the ballot box. There are problems with the other system, but it is closer to fair than the current caucus system.

Gof
kaysville,, UT

And the Secret Combination grows ever larger.

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