Comments about ‘Linda & Richard Eyre: Does a child really cost that much?’

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Published: Tuesday, Aug. 27 2013 6:40 p.m. MDT

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county mom
Monroe, UT

Our children are an investment in the future of our family, our communities, and our nation.
They are our greatest assets.
They are our only lasting legacy on this earth.

Invest wisely.

Things to remember; children do not need all the frills and gadgets.
We played with dolls and toy cars. We played outside with our friends, climbing trees and playing ball.
We never wore designer clothes or had our own bedroom. Children do not need things, they need love and hope. A full belly, a warm blanket and a loving parent to read to them.

The best toy for any child is a wonderful imagination!

Gildas
LOGAN, UT

I've always been annoyed at these estimates although agreeing that many parents spend far more than necessary on children.

When there is a large family often clothes worn by rapidly-growing children are bequeathed to the next child in line; don't buy only blue and pink. Little children can only eat so much. Most childhood ailments are commonplace and do not require emergency room status. Children share bedrooms in a larger family. One bathroom per household was standard for a very long time. Children of the same gender can often share beds too.

Clothes can be home made, used or hand-me-downs. You don't need to buy a new, more expensive home every time a child is born. You don't have to pay your child's way through Harvard or any other university. Children can actually be an asset not a liability by learning to help tend fruit and vegetable gardens, assist in household chores etc. One family car will do for many families, or a used van perhaps while numbers are at their highest. Allowances can be modest - and even earned. Avoid expensive school (or church) activities.

Danny Chipman
Lehi, UT

Great, common sense advice from the Eyres, county mom, and Gildas!

Also, while I acknowledge that some moms literally must work to supplement or provide the income, I would speculate that many in a two-income house could come home if they were simply objective and willing to live frugally. I recall an episode of Oprah some years ago that had a financial specialist interview a working mom who said she wished she could be home with her son but couldn't afford to stay home. The specialist examined her expenditures. Once her work wardrobe, food costs (lunches and outings with colleagues, clients and quick-to-make dinners from the store for her family), transportation, and day care costs (which can be as much as private school tuition) were added up, she found it to be more than her take-home pay. She was paying to be away from her son. Tears followed.

K
Mchenry, IL

Clothes and food aren not what causes havoc on a family budget. It's the medical premium and the medical not covered. It's braces. Its the education. It's the large vehicle.

But who cares what they cost? Children are a joy.

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