Comments about ‘Philadelphia scrambles to find funds as schools teeter on the edge’

Return to article »

Published: Thursday, Aug. 22 2013 11:05 p.m. MDT

  • Oldest first
  • Newest first
  • Most recommended
Morristown, NJ

Nice article on an important topic.

Still, something doesn't quite seem right.

"Faced with a $304 deficit last June, Philadelphia schools slashed payrolls and budgets earlier this summer, issuing thousands of pink slips."

Thousands of pink slips for $304 deficit? Surely a bake sale could have raised $304, no? Perhaps the deficit was $304 million instead?

Bountiful, UT

Problems with public employee unions have been building for decades and are popping up all over the nation. Politicians, in negotiations with public employee unions are very generous in making promises someone else will have to keep. There is no one so generous as a politician spending someone else's money.

Merritt Island, Fl

The problem is that the State has not spent enough to find illegal voters. Millions were spent last year and came up with zero illegal voters. Spend another dozen milloins and verify. Also, spend a zillion on State religion efforts such as abortion efforts, approved religions (no Muslems) and womens care.
The State spends promoting and supporting State politician ideology, not the simple operation of the State.

Saint George, UT

Two words: Democrats; Unions.

Southern, UT

When everyone was making hand over fist and governments had cash up to their eyeballs (remember that day), governments promised teachers pensions in lieu of raises so they could divert education money to pet projects. Now they want it back. Businessmen made fun of teachers for 15 years as they made a meager living looking forward to security. Businessmen chose money up front, teachers chose security. Not that the economy has turned, it is not fair to take away the teacher's security.

Howard Beal
Provo, UT

Promises were made and contracts MUST be obligated. The teachers negotiated in good faith.

to comment

DeseretNews.com encourages a civil dialogue among its readers. We welcome your thoughtful comments.
About comments