Comments about ‘Dick Harmon: Can BYU recover from the cornerback injury train?’

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Published: Wednesday, Aug. 21 2013 7:25 p.m. MDT

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Salt Lake City, UT

One of the great things about all of those teams is that it is almost always that the Y makes do with journeymen and not masters in a lot of positions. Recently the Y has had worthy linebackers and some really good running backs but linemen like the Dennys, Reynolds or J. Bucks have been a little rare since Roger French retired. Defense has great safties but not so great corners.
It's a team that gets those results with just a few stellar players. That doesn't sit well with the "We got more stars that you do" gang but it's results that count and the season results are what matters.

El Chango Supremo
Rexburg, ID

It's just not good!

Salt Lake City, UT

Football is stupid and BYU should hang up the jerseys and call it quits. The guaranteed injuries, the BCS, the ncaa student slavery contracts, the BCS, and the excessive head coach pay.

What redeeming quality does college football possess? None!

Frozen Chosen
Savage, MN

I know you're trying to be positive, Dick, but this situation is not good for BYU. You can protect your corners for a quarter or two but it's very hard to do for and entire game. The lack of quality and depth at the corner position will cost BYU at least 2 losses that they wouldn't have had otherwise. It could mean the difference between a 10-2 season and an 8-4 one or, even worse, the difference between an 8-4 season and a 6-6 one.

Unless this new offense really surprises us and averages 35 pts a game, the corner situation will hurt BYU.

Glendora, CA

Opposing coaches will know to throw, throw, throw.

Scott Farcus
Beaver, UT

Domino effect

American Fork, UT

Can Jacob Hanneman rejoin the football team after his baseball season is over? Danny Ainge played pro baseball and still played basketball for a season or two correct? Or do NCAA rules not allow any professionalism at all now?

Woods Cross, UT

Have to agree with Frozen Chosen, & this is not an anti-BYU posting.

Every football afficianado knows that opposing teams will do an in-depth analysis of strengths & weaknesses prior to & also during a game. The edges will be the equivalent of an I-15 highway for them this year since it's most likely 'way too late to add to the roster.

And this is even BEFORE whatever game injuries occur, for example, in other positions or (doubling the impact) in the CB position.

LBs & safeties will also have to adjust based on the CB issues, so the first domino will be the edge, and then the second will be the middle when LBs & safeties set up wider than normal in an effort to protect.

Just shows to go you that no matter the team, no matter the ostensible success in recruitment, the type, frequency, and location of injuries will always be a wild card for any team in any particular year.

Ernest T. Bass
Bountiful, UT

I'm not worried at all. We always reload.

Sandy, UT

O ye of little faith.

BYU has always had depth and speed issues at corner. The current situation only appears dire by comparison to the depth and speed BYU was going to have this year.

Bronco will make adjustments and BYU's defense will be solid.

Looking forward to an exciting and successful year for BYU football.

Salt Lake City, UT

Finally a sensible, reasoned and intelligent comment from a Utah fan about a BYU issue. Although I try to stay out of Utah articles (Even though I am a graduate) I appreciate legitimate comments and insights.
The best comment you made was that injuries are a wildcard. I have seen injuries derail the most promising years for the Y and the lack of significant injuries during Utah's run to the Sugar Bowl turned a less than promising team into an undefeated team.
Utah and BYU both suffer from the same status. They get excellent first string recruits. Even second string players step forward. But the depth of third, fourth and fifth aren't there like at Alabama and Notre Dame.
Air Force is a good example. They come out like gang busters every year. (See Year BYU played them first) Yet by half way they have been devastated by injuries (when Utah played them) and they lose the rest of the way.
I don't worry about the corners (I'm not the coach, hahaha). Four of the injured have returned to practice and things aren't so dire right now.

Stop The Nonsense
El Paso, TX

These CB injuries probably helped my expectations come down to a reasonable level. I wasn't expecting undefeated, but I was really hoping for (and therefore would have been disappointed with less than) 10-2. Now, I'll just sit back and enjoy the games and won't get too worked up over wins and losses. Hope these guys can heal properly so they can not only play next year, but have functioning bodies for the rest of their adult lives.

Christopher B
Ogden, UT


Korea, AE

I am not worried.

West Point , UT

If Chris B says no, I'm that much more confident that the defense will be fine. Thanks Chrissy for lifting my spirits. "LOL"

Johnny Triumph
American Fork, UT

BYU needs to lead the charge in eliminating football in order to limit traumatic injury. BYU's own Ronney Jenkins is included in a story on CNN today, it's a shame that we can't just eliminate the damaging sports from places of learning. It's time, BYU. Drop football and continue to be a leader in Academia.

Orem, UT


"Can Jacob Hanneman rejoin the football team after his baseball season is over?"

As grueling and injury-prone a sport as football is, it's doubtful that Jacob's baseball contract would even allow him to play a sport like football during the off season.


Given that most of these CB injuries occurred last spring or early in training camp, Bronco has had time to adjust his lineup and move some players from offense to defense. It'll be interesting to see how a WR adjusts to playing CB. It may surprise a few who see nothing but gloom and doom.

Henry Drummond
San Jose, CA

Sometimes having limited talent also limits the defensive playbook. That isn't necessarily bad. Successful teams aren't always surprising people with a multitude of different looks, they just get very good at what they do. That is what I would look for in this year's BYU defense.

Beaver Native
Garland, UT


How about morale and loyalty to the school? How about all the national exposure and advertising? In terms of players, how about character, commitment and perseverance? How about the ability to be a team player when they join the workforce?

Most worthwhile endeavors in life require taking some type of risk. No one who has ever made a significant contribution to any endeavor has done so without taking bold steps into the unknown.

Those who want to ban football concentrate on the few who go through life permanently handicapped or die in the sport. I would guess that a higher percentage of people are permanently injured or die in automobile accidents than there is of football players who are permanently injured or die playing football. Does that mean we should ban cars? Farmers have an even higher risk of bodily harm or death from farming accidents. Does that mean that farming should be banned?

No, I would suggest that the potential benefits gained by a football player playing football outweigh the risks of the game. Perhaps the answer is not to ban the game, but to reduce the risk of injury.

Oceanside, CA

I've learned not to underestimate Bronco when it comes to defense. While it may not be a perfect fix, I believe he'll come up with something so that it will lessen the seemingly dire situation. BYU will be ok on defense.

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