Comments about ‘Red-band trailers: Why parents should know what they are, and how easy they are to access’

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Published: Friday, Aug. 16 2013 10:30 a.m. MDT

Updated: Wednesday, Feb. 19 2014 5:55 p.m. MST

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Ernest T. Bass
Bountiful, UT

Gosh, these are scary.

BYU Track Star
Los Angeles, CA

Well it just goes to show: you learn something new everyday. Friday night is movie night for me. I didn't know they color coded movie trailers now. And these "Red" branded movies contain "R" Rated material if I read the article correctly. Does this now mean when I go in for a Temple recommend interview and my Bishop asks me if I frequent "R" rated movies. Do I hedge my bets and say "No I don't frequent "R" rated movies but I watch "Red" branded Movie Trailers. Boy, talk about needing to stay on top of rapidly changing movie ratings? Do I further Hedge my bets and say I activly cover my ears and close my eyes when the "Red" branded preview trailers appear in the Movie houses? Oh good grief, prehaps I shouldn't get out of bed in the morning now.

Heidi T.
Farmington, UT

What action have parents taken to KNOW their children's instructor, Bradley Moss? Why is Bradley Moss requiring such assignments from his students and now what action are responsible parents going to take to protect their children from such instructors? What consequences will Mr. Moss experience from the District Administrators and the Principal at Maple Mountain. Parents ask for a syllabus or curriculum outline from each of your children's teachers. This situation is way out of bounds!

Hutterite
American Fork, UT

If you're worried about these then you have not prepared your children to exist in society. There's a lot 'worse' out there if you want to look for it, like the entire movie that the trailer references.

shimmer
Orem, UT

Okay people calm down. You won't see these trailers when you go to a theater because they are only available online. All of the ones I have ever seen I had to consent. Also BYU Track Star, are you aware that students watch some R rated movies in BYU's film classes?

Thinkman
Provo, UT

I have a friend whose child had Mr Moss as a teacher. I met him once. Nice guy.

I think he is trying to be very careful as MMHS is a VERY "LDS Church is the center-of-your-life school" and he may be fearful he will lose his job there. I know the superintendent and he is very ultra-Mormon, but he likely won't let this bother him.

VST
Bountiful, UT

@BYU Track Star,

The question "(Do you) frequent "R" rated movies?" is NOT one of the questions that should be asked by your Bishop during an interview for a Temple Recommend.

cindyacre
Shelley, ID

Hutterite, if people don't want to be part of that culture, they really can choose not to be. Yes, "stuff" is out there, but it can be and IS avoidable. One does not have to succumb to evil, look for evil, look AT evil, or have one's agency intruded upon in anyway.

wer
South Jordan, UT

Any high school teacher who would have their students view anything associated with "Evil Dead" needs to have his/her continued employment seriously examined. There is no redeeming value to this movie or the three that proceeded it. It wasn't as if it was named "House of Flowers" and marketed intentionally marketed to misled the public.

The producers glory in this gore horror genre. They describe it as "The most terrifying film you will ever experience." For the teacher to not know what a Red Band trailer is, well, that's one thing. But, to have his/her students actually watch a trailer for the purpose of further discussion, actually validates the movie.

This was a bad decision and needs to followed up by school authorities.

Osgrath
Provo, UT

Heidi, please! Evidence indicates Mr. Moss was as unaware of the existence of Red Band trailers as the student was. We know that you are not perfect, so I think you ought to cut the teacher a little slack and allow him to make an honest mistake.

I don't always agree with Hutterite, but here he is spot on. You need to teach your children well so that they can interact with society while maintain integrity and balance. That is the parent's job, more so than the job of the teacher.

Noodlekaboodle
Poplar Grove, UT

@Wer
Amen. If you tell a kid to watch an Evil Dead trailer what do you think their going to see? It's a violent, ultra gory movie. Shockingly the trailer was gory and ultra violent. I just went and watched the green band trailer and guess what? It was pretty gory and violent as well. A film teacher who doesn't know that should consider a new line of work....

BU52
Provo, ut

Interesting chance to slam an educator since school doesn't start until next week.

Hamath
Omaha, NE

@ cindyacre

Exactly!

Incite Full
Layton, UT

Fwiw, I've stumbled upon these trailers on Hulu (just regular Hulu, we don't do Hulu Plus), they usually have some kind of warning on the front of them, but that's hardly much when you've got a kid logged in on their own.

E.S
Bountiful, UT

VST,

It's not only a matter of should the bishop ask that question during a temple recommend interview or should he not, but it is indeed a matter of personal righteousness. Can I watch R-rated movies, yes. Should I? Everyone should answer that by themselves. However, if a person really follow the gospel teachings and the advice of their leader, surely they should not watch R-rated movies.

There are those who say the Church never really said anything about R-rated movies before. Well, they are wrong. In Pres. Ezra Taft Benson said the following at the April 1986 General Conference: "Don’t see R-rated movies or vulgar videos or participate in any entertainment that is immoral, suggestive, or pornographic.." Does he or any other leader need to be more straightforward than that? Nope!

Is the problem only with R-rated movies? No. But if a bishop knows a particular member watches R-rated movies, he should seriously consider that before authorizing a temple recommend.

Brent T. Aurora CO
Aurora, CO

E.S. One should pay attention to current church leaders and what they are and are not saying. Which isn't to say Benson was giving dated advice. In the 70's Kimball said to not use playing cards. Nor should you fake the games with a Rook deck.

R vs. PG is NOT a useful line. It is extremely inconsistent and unreliable. Of particular concern is that there are MANY television shows which most certainly might get an R rating now if they were movies, a R rating in Benson's day -- they aren't movies. CSI -- great show. Educational (getting tired maybe now, and cloned and repeated) though certainly graphic. MASH was an R rated movie for several reasons of which one principally was graphic (tame today) operating room scenes. Knowing why a movie is rated may help; mostly the sites (where others endure the offensive material, how fair is that?) which describe content are helpful. Also, books including a lot of Young Adult fiction are "R" rated.

Last, this standard is NOT part of the recommend interview either asked or judged upon (if known). Nor should it be.

VST
Bountiful, UT

@E.S.

This one is old enough to vote. If you want me to respond, then you better do it within the first couple days of the posting of the article. The only reason I am responding to you now is someone had flagged my very-old comment favorability which resulted in a 10 vote approval count, which automatically sends an E-Mail to the commenter.

You need to understand, that this question (PG or R-rated) is NOT now on the current standard interview list of questions to be asked by your Bishop, Stake President, or their Counselors (see Brent's comment above). Church leadership training is very specific about these questions and leaders are directed to ONLY ask the questions approved by the General Authorities during a Temple Recommend interview.

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