Comments about ‘Linda & Richard Eyre: Which culture is stronger — yours or the world's?’

Return to article »

Published: Tuesday, Aug. 6 2013 7:10 p.m. MDT

Comments
  • Oldest first
  • Newest first
  • Most recommended
dr.bridell
mclean, VA

AMEN, and Thanks for this! If we as parents don't do it, who will?!

A Scientist
Provo, UT

More black-white thinking, us vs them, treating everything simplistically and as a war...this is neither a healthy nor truthful way of seeing things.

jeanie
orem, UT

Excellent article! A strong family culture and involved parents do more to create stable, healthy and contributing adults than any public institution. It also stacks the cards in favor of young people staying away from destructive behaviors. As a public school teacher I see ample evidence of this.

RedShirt
USS Enterprise, UT

To "A Scientist" but it is a way. Just look at the influences coming into our homes through TV and the internet. Even the Disney shows that are geared towards tweens have all sorts of behaviors that are not healthy for raising kids.

Do you think it is good for teens to engage in sexual relationships as early as 12?

Do you think that it is good for kids to think that drinking and drug abuse are normal?

Do you think that it is good for kids to view thier parents as ignorant people that know nothing?

Do you think that kids should be allowed to ignore any restrictions that you place on them?

Do you think that it is healthy for kids to feel entitled to whatever they want regardless of their behavior?

The world teaches our kids that they are special, and are wonderful at everything, even when they are not.

That is what "the world" teaches. Do you think that leads to a healthy society?

Unwieldy Toaster
Bluffdale, UT

1. Create a family culture of time spent together - agreed. What about turning down callings that interfere with family time?

2. Create a family culture of full church activity and commitment. - not necessarily. Strong families are built on love and commitment. You can be as religious or as secular as you want.

3. Create a family culture of prioritized relationships. - Agreed.

4. Create a family culture of rich family traditions and family laws. Agreed.

@ redshirt
Do you think it is good for teens to engage in sexual relationships as early as 12?
How about 14? ie Helen Mar Kimball

RedShirt
USS Enterprise, UT

To "Unwieldy Toaster" I hate to break it to you, but Helen Mar Kimball didn't engage in sexual relationships until she was married at age 16. For that time in history that was young, but not too uncommon.

As for families spending time together. Other than Bishop or Stake President, what callings interfere with "family time"? Even those don't interfere unless you allow it to.

GAmom
Athens, GA

I think so many commentors are looking for picky things and not looking for the overall message of this article-create a family culture of strength and committment because kids will look for that either at home or elsewhere. How we each choose to do that is what is unique and makes us strong as a family. also the 2nd point I think is being judged for what it is not. I found that being active in a church gives families and individuals opportunities to serve others. Our family has been very committed to church callings as bishop, stake pres, yw and RS pres and how we approached those helped strengthn our kids and taught them to serve and helped us grow as a family unit. You can also do the same things if you are not religious by serving in the community around you. I was raised in a nonreligious family yet my parents were always serving and took us right along with them to community gardens, homeless shelters, school tutoring which gave me a rich heritage of watching over those around us.

A Scientist
Provo, UT

RedShirt wrote:

"To 'A Scientist' but it is a way."

You are OK with unhealthy, untruthful ways of seeing things?

and

"Just look at the influences coming into our homes through TV and the internet."

These "influences" have always been around. Many people teach their children not to be "acted upon" like puppets. Many people teach their children "correct principles" and empower them to govern themselves. Is that missing in your home?

As for all the rhetorical questions, research shows that:

- teen sex and pregnancy are down;
- drinking and drug abuse are down;
- kids viewing their parents as ignorant people is limited to certain Western and Southern States;

"The world teaches our kids that they are special, and are wonderful at everything, even when they are not."

Who is this "the World" to which you refer? I suggest it is a figment of LDS imagination, invented in order to create an enemy against which to rally religious zeal.

The fact remains: dichotomous thinking is unhealthy and untruthful.

jeanie
orem, UT

Redshirt -

You are correct. The popular culture ("the world" in LDS vernacular) does not teach healthy behavior. It actively promotes the opposite.

Working with over 600 kids each school year this is what I notice. Kids who come from a strong family culture are more confident, resilient, and happy. Kids who are more influenced by the popular culture struggle socially and are more insecure.

Redshirt1701
Deep Space 9, Ut

To "A Scientist" thanks for helping to make my point.

You apparently agree that it does take a strong family culture to overcome the negative and destructive influences coming from TV and the internet.

Since when is dichotomous thinking unhealthy and untruthful? Jesus taught that you are either for him or against him and many other dichotomous ideas. Are you saying that the things that Jesus taught were not healthy or that he was lying?

to comment

DeseretNews.com encourages a civil dialogue among its readers. We welcome your thoughtful comments.
About comments