Comments about ‘Right on the money: Which presidents are now on American currency?’

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Published: Monday, Aug. 5 2013 12:55 a.m. MDT

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TiCon2
Cedar City, UT

Jackson on the $20 is ridiculous. Jackson was a proud racist, an "exterminator" of Native Americans, and detested any ethnic groups other than his own caucasian background. Jackson was also a wealthy slaveholder, protested the creation of a National bank and discouraged Americans from using paper money. He is also the Father of the National Debt.

If any bill needs a new face, it's the $20. Put MLK Jr., Susan B. Anthony, Clara Barton, Marie Curie, etc. There are hundreds of notable American figures more worthy of the recognition than Jackson.

Russ
Salt Lake City, UT

I totally agree with replacing Jackson. Calvin Coolidge, John F. Kennedy or Ronald Reagan would be far better on the $20. Also in need of replacement are Hamilton (terrible president for many reasons), U.S. Grant (our own little dictator).
Replace Hamilton with Coolidge, replace Jackson with Kennedy and replace Grant with Madison. There, all better now.

spring street
SALT LAKE CITY, UT

There was a second coin with an historical female figure on it - the Sacajawea Dollar.

It was first minted in 2000 and is still being minted although there have been years when it has not been available for general circulation.

Eliyahu
Pleasant Grove, UT

I'm not sure why we even need faces on our currency. Perhaps some of our native animals and birds would work better? In any case, if we do want to see presidents on money, I would suggest rotating them, replacing the face with a different one on each bill as a new version is released. We look at the numbers on the corners to see the denomination; not the face in the center.

Te Amo
Salt Lake City, UT

I don't know what everyone is so excited about. n Our "payment certificates" have no value and, in fact, they have built in inflation in them which amounts to an additional tax of about 5% with no deductions whatsoever. There is no relationship here to real money.

Russ
Salt Lake City, UT

Although I agree in general with Te Amo, there is a problem with that kind of thinking. As long as we can buy goods and services with paper money we will always use it. Of course gold and other precious metals are the real money, but until we can get rid of the Federal Reserve system we are kind of stuck.

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