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Comments about ‘More Millennials living at home, despite end of recession’

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Published: Friday, Aug. 2 2013 6:45 p.m. MDT

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Ernest T. Bass
Bountiful, UT

The recession couldn't be over, Obama is still in the White House.

LA Mormon
West Valley, UT

The recession is over and this has nothing to do with the President. This has to do with generational warfare so to speak. The economy is currently going through a huge transition. Manufacturing jobs which used to pay good wages and have long term guarantees have been replaced with low skilled service jobs that are not paying as well as the jobs that are lost. Unfortunately these millenials through no fault of their own are now caught in this economic transition. The only fix for this is a recognition of the need for service jobs to pay better wages and provide more opportunities for the Millenial generation. If these problems are not solved there will be major negative consequences for our future. The next generations deserve better and hopefully they will get it before things get worse.

george of the jungle
goshen, UT

The cost of living will keep going higher and service wages wont. Good luck to the parents in their old age. It's a shock to see your self in the mirror, and you look like your dad, think about how it feels like when you look like your grandfather, and your son looks like your dad.

@Charles
not from utah, 00

"Even though the recession officially ended in 2009, young adults continue to struggle financially."

Maybe that's your problem. You think the recession is over when it isn't. Oh the stock market is setting new "fake" highs but that's only because Benancke makes new money out of thin air. At some point, it will come crashing down, just like the housing market.

The problem with millenials is that they haven't learned anything. All they know how to do is text and play video games.

Howard Beal
Provo, UT

There is how economists define a recession being over and then there is reality. The recession for most of us is FAR from over...

Way of the Warrior
ARLINGTON, WA

I am a "Millennial". I've been extremely blessed to have been employed in my field since graduating in 2008. Not to brag, but I do live on my own, I am independent, and I am 100% debt free (through extreme budgeting, I was able to pay off all my student loans early).

DVD
Taylorsville, 00

The Millenials (and the rest of us) are competing with slavery overseas doing work that used to have a fair wage here. Short of international engagements and treaties regarding corporate slavery, that's going to be tough to resolve. Separately, it isn't strange that they're debt-shy. They've seen the results of having debt and no income and also seen that despite the cruel words of some, it isn't always the fault of those having the difficult time.

Say No to BO
Mapleton, UT

Sure, the recession is over (if you say so), but it was a jobless recovery.
There are huge numbers of underemployed and people who have left the job market altogether.
I can't imagine Millennials giving up, but I sure know lots of 50-somethings who are in forced retirement.
My 24-year-old is still at home. She was able to find a part-time job. She couldn't possibly live off that paycheck but at least she doesn't have school loan debt.
If this is what a recovery looks like I'd hate to see a recession.

Thrive
Provo, UT

I'm a Millenial and own a house, car, and am debt-free. But, I'm the exception rather than the rule. So many of people my age have had too much handed to them--they do not value hard work. They use the recession as an excuse, though there are plenty of jobs if you are willing to get the right education and MOVE to the jobs. Parents are to blame for enabling this behavior as much as the Millenials. A lot of my friends are under-employed with jobs that do not include benefits. It's going to be a scary time when Millenials retire, because so many do not have 401Ks.

Zona Zone
Mesa, AZ

It's only fair that Millennials use this time to splurge off their parents who will then splurge off their children and grandchildren through government-provided benefits for decades to come.

dobberdobber
Ivins, UT

The recession is over for the 1%. They are the only ones that really count in this Country. Just ask them.

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