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Comments about ‘Solar users hope more Utahns will make the switch’

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Published: Saturday, July 27 2013 8:40 p.m. MDT

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SingerGuy59
Orem, UT

I applied to the City of Orem to put up three wind turbines and 16 solar panels on my home last summer and received 26 line items of exceptions that I needed to handle before the process would be approved. The company I bought my system from said I had set a new bar for the most convoluted bureaucratic nonsense they had ever seen. In my opinion the City of Orem not only does not encourage homeowners from going solar, they put up every roadblock possible to make it an impossibility for the average homeowner to complete the process without hiring an expensive contractor to get through the paperwork. Once installed my system will generate 8,600 watts per hour if the sun is shining and the canyon wind is blowing. Instead it sits in my garage while I fight the red tape.

cjb
Bountiful, UT

If solar energy continues to get less expensive, people will adopt it, already the early adopters are and this will expand.

If solar cells are placed on the roof in the summer, not only do they block the sun from much of heating the house the electricity produced can be used to power air conditioners.

cjb
Bountiful, UT

Re singerGuy

Elect more intelligent people to city office in Orem.

From Ted's Head
Orem, UT

I love the idea of using solar energy! But I'm not willing (or able) to make an investment that might take 7-15 years to break even. And I live in Orem, too. :-(

Thinkin\' Man
Rexburg, ID

Tax incentives and power company rebates come from your neighbors. They are inefficient and unsustainable, and in a real way unfair.

If a power technology cannot make it on its own merits in a free economy, it is obviously not a viable idea. And if an electrical supply cannot work 100% of the time, and must therefore be backed up by a traditional power source, it is redundant and unneeded.

Cost, toxic pollution in production, cloudy days, northern latitudes, night, and hail storms are powerful arguments against solar panels. But on the positive side, I suppose they do help the wealthy feel good about themselves.

Doug10
Roosevelt, UT

Thinkin Man, how is it up there on your high horse?

If a technology cannot make it on its own merits in a free economy....
that would mean farming is no longer viable as farmers receive subsidized fuel, tax cuts,
insulation used in your home also is subsidized
the wood from mills used to build your home receives federal tax breaks
have you heard of child tax credits? I suppose children are outlawed now
oil and natural gas each benefit from a drilling subsidy each oil company in America uses
coal plants that burn coal and generate electricity are subsidized

the largest breakthrough in Solar technology for the past 5 years did not come from the panels but from the financing of the technology to the homeowner. It might take 5-10 years to pay it off but you can pay it off with the savings each month from your reduced electric bill, you do not have to come up with additional capital. After that it saves you money and it saves the environment.

Take away the things from the free econopmy that are not subsidized, you no longer have housing, food or even cars to drive.

lesw
Murray, UT

Re SingerGuy: You seem to have bought a nice PV system, but the red tape seems terrible. Have you considered something you can get and use now for other energy intensive needs, like cooking? Earlier this summer I decided to try out a solar grill and I'm happy I did! I've been using my One Earth Designs' SolSource solar cooker for things like omelets in the morning and steaks in the evenings. I haven't had to turn on my stove or gas grill since then, and I think the payback period is almost already here. It's good we are all trying to use more of the sun's energy.

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