Comments about ‘Commentary: 'Power 5' commissioners' strategy could mean the end of social mobility in college football’

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Published: Friday, July 26 2013 12:34 a.m. MDT

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hobbes1012003
Kaysville, UT

Why are the so called power conferences so worried? they still rake in millions of dollars every year and they are still the "power conferences." whatever happened to the idea of open competition? This isnt about football anymore, this is all about money and how the rich guys in the good ol' boy club can stay rich and hoard everything for themselves. Sad times for college football.

Steven S Jarvis
Orem, UT

Utah and other lower tier schools of the five conferences would still have programs, but never be competitive again as the top talent goes to their competition. We have already seen how Utah compares with the PAC in recruiting, and it hasn't been good. They are barely treading water.

At least with the status quo, Utah has a chance at bowl eligibility with being able to schedule Idaho State, SUU and Weber state as a "guaranteed win" each year. If they must replace those games with away games at bigger programs to offset the cost of paying players, they aren't going to win games.

BYU might have to join a conference. I love independence as it has so far been fantastic. 2012 had BYU face 5 teams ranked at the end of the season. 2013 has the most bowl eligible programs BYU has faced from the previous year. 2014 has the makings of being as good as this year for playing winning teams as the programs we will face have a better overall record than the ones we face in 2013. I would hate being locked into having to play the same teams every year again.

Mark321
Las Vegas, NV

If a stipend ends up happening than the athletes better keep the grades up and get to practices on time and not get in trouble. I believe if any of these 3 things are not met than the stipend gets taken away. No matter how anyone tries to spin this education comes FIRST period, even though I question some of the programs who I believe want this more for the money than the educational aspect.

Chris B
Salt Lake City, UT

This will be the final nail in the coffin for "Non-BCS" schools who wish they were with the big boys.

The 5 power conferences will soon make up the entirety of the highest division in football, and only they will be eligible for the national championship.

The days are not far off from byu and usu being division II Programs

Yes!

poyman
Lincoln City, OR

Not gonna happen... Any Division 1 Colleges left out would file a class action Anti-Trust Suit and win going away.

Dutchman
Murray, UT

Paying football players? That also means paying every athlete in college that plays any sport. Will the trustees (the brethren) who run BYU allow this? I doubt it. BYU is getting boxed in, not only by being an independent on the outside looking in but the pay issue is going to be a real challenge for them going forward.

Chris B
Salt Lake City, UT

When superconferences form, which conference do byu fans think will "save" them from permanently being excluded from the ranks of the big boys?

Pac 12? Oh no we wont
SEC? LOL
Big 10? Not a chance
ACC? Keep dreaming
Big 12? You had your chance and burned that bridge long ago. And the Big 12 chose to go east.

There is exactly a 0% chance that a big conference will come to byu's rescue as the big 5 are solidified as the only legitimate teams in the country.

All other programs can make up their own "national championship" if they want between the MWC, Conference USA.... and other little teams

But the hope of moving to play with the big boys will be OVER

dden45
Provo, Utah

Really, though, this would be the nail in the coffin for about 30 or so schools within those five leagues, including schools like TCU and Utah, who made the jump. It would mean that unless a school pull in a ton of money outside of what it gets from being in an elite conference, that school is just going to be a doormat (this would probably include BYU if they were to join a power conference). The smaller schools within those conferences should be joining some of these 'mid-major' and lesser schools in the fight against this.

Chris B
Salt Lake City, UT

Regardless of the specifics of how it plays out, there will be a few constants:

1. Utah will be IN
2. byu will be OUT
3. usu will be OUT

I love my prestigious Pac 12 membership!

We EARNED it just in the nick of time. College football is about to chance permanently.

And I'm IN!

Mighty Mouse
Salt Lake City, Utah

If this isn't collusion in restraint of trade what is? Time to dust of the antitrust lawsuit again. Eventually someone is going to have to teach these power drunk commissioners in the big conferences a lesson in the courtroom.

Chris B
Salt Lake City, UT

@Christy,

And where would byu be during this time?

Division II.

LOL!

BlueCoug
Orem, UT

Dutchman

"Paying football players? That also means paying every athlete in college that plays any sport."

Says who?

"The Brethren" don't pay for BYU athletics, fans and donors do, so paying or not paying athletes is a non-issue as far as the long-term viability of BYU athletics is concerned.

BYU has been working to endow athletic scholarships for years and well over half of all of BYU's athletic scholarships are already endowed. Adding an additional stipend onto those scholarships is not a big deal; it'll just take a little more fund raising.

STuFOO
Korea, AE

For anyone beating their chests about BCS membership and how this little power grab is going to change the face of football I got one word for you...

Litigation.

Stop and think for a second. Are there more constituents (not fans) inside the power 5 or outside of the power 5? Politicians don't care about fans, they care about getting re-elected.

Although BYU is not particularly litigious, there are plenty of schools who are. And, for those of you who don't understand case law, a precedent exists that quashes this entire idea...

its called the NCAA basketball tournament. And the courts could be tied up for years.

If you don't think there would be lawsuits over this, you're crazy, what with the money involved. You think "power" conferences are greedy, just wait until politicians, states, and boosters get involved.

Then politicians and lawyers will get involved to restructure the entire college football program, killing conferences, TV deals, and bowl affiliations.

So good luck with all the chest beating ute "fans." As always, you put your pride in the wrong institutions.

I hope you don't hurt yourselves.

VegasUte
Las Vegas, NV

I would have to agree with poyman and bluecoug.

The litigation cost would be staggering.

If it cam down to paying a stipend to athletes, I don't think the "brethren" would be required to give their blessing.

I really like Larry Scott's voice on the topic: "I'm certainly aligned with what you heard from my colleagues this week in terms of the need for transformative change, but I think it can be evolutionary and not revolutionary.

"I don't think it will be as confrontational and controversial a process as some of the reports I have heard this week."

Go Utes!!

Naval Vet
Philadelphia, PA

"Ever since the University of Utah broke through after the 2004 season, at least one team in the mid-major world has been the thorn in the BCS's side almost every year." -- Landon Hemsley

I suppose that depends on how one views a "thorn in the BCS's side". If by "thorn" one means a non-AQ team taking a BCS bowl slot, than yes, Utah, Boise St, Hawai'i, TCU, and No. Illinois had given the power brokers some degree of heartburn. Nevertheless, I'm not sure that Hawai'i or NIU really hurt the BCS that much. Those two non-AQ schools had provided substantial evidence, via their lopsided scores, that they in fact did NOT belong in a BCS bowl, but were rather "pretenders" gaming the system by backing in via weak SOS. Neither team beat ANY ranked teams, and vs. teams from BCS leagues, they went 2-1...with UH beating Washington (4-9), and NIU taking down Kansas (1-11) -- both by a single TD. The sole loss was NIU dropping a virtual Home game to a 4-8 Iowa team.

Naval Vet
Philadelphia, PA

(cont...)

Essentially, there had been only 3 teams who'd struck fear in the power brokers, and since 2 are now power conference members, that leaves only Boise St. One single threat to the BCS system.

STuFOO
Korea, AE

It still cracks me up that utah "fans" think they "busted" something created because of BYU.

u all need to understand history, not just claim that u were history.

Todd Christiansen's Thesaurus
Ogden, UT

Hey Ute fans! The fourth paragraph on the second page is a reference to U.

Bleed Crimson
Sandy, Utah

@ STuFOO

"It still cracks me up that utah "fans" think they "busted" something created because of BYU.

u all need to understand history, not just claim that u were history"

It still cracks me up that BYU fans feel they should be credited for Utah's success. That's a sign of either jealousy or insecurity. Utah busted the BCS on their own and BYU in no way shape or form helped Utah "bust" the BCS. (Except maybe standing as a punching bag in Utah's regular season finale on their way to the BCS). The only thing historical BYU should be credited for is the creation of the BCS. Thanks to their flukey 1984 title! Thanks BYU for ruining College Football's post season!

Wookie
Omaha, NE

Dear Duckhunter, scholarships in the sense that you refer to in the aforementioned article are not deemed income by the IRS. Therefore, they are not getting paid and it is not a taxable event. However, it is debatable that if in fact the power conferences pay their athletes, the likelihood of this being taxed is fairly significant. Although not part of your post, its worth mentioning, as for anti-trust laws, the way that they power conferences could remove themselves from this discussion or scrutiny would be to create a seperate conference with separate rules and regulations to join or be a part of.

Lastly, what do you think the Bretheren would say as to your belittling comment to dutchman?

GO UTES!!

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