Comments about ‘Heavy rain leads to flooding in Sandy homes despite storm-drain upgrades’

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Published: Sunday, July 7 2013 5:05 p.m. MDT

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My2Cents
Taylorsville, UT

This is the desert and these storms of late are "typical" for the climate of thousands of years that are nothing new. Deseret are prone to flash flooding. Developers and city planners and zoning laws are in place but when you grease the hands of politicians with greenbacks all the zoning laws and climatic weather probabilities are rezoned out of existence.

There is no excuse by city planners and developers who have violated the zoning laws to build homes and endanger families and lives to make a buck for the city. The city's should be held accountable and pay up on their lies and misinformation and corruptions. All the areas having flooding, mud slides, and sink holes have been zoned "no build" zones and flash flood zones since the 1930's and Utah and its cities and church leaders business owners keep putting families and people in harms way for greed.

Sandy city, West Jordan, and many other communities has been guilty of fraud and pathetic excuse that the home owner should have done some geological survey investigation before they bought known high risk hazards zones the government already new existed before they approved the development.

Strider303
Salt Lake City, UT

Something to consider: Require an independent geological hazard evaluation of all new sub divisions that is required to be disclosed to potential buyers. And permit an agreement to purchase a house to be nullified if the owner/potential owner has a hazard evaluation done at his own expense and decides not to purchase based upon the hazard information.

Zoning laws and construction laws, actually they are ordinances with the force of law, are a political creation and subject to influence by the public which includes contractors, developers, real estate brokers, you get the idea.

There are two maxims that come to mind: No good deed goes unpunished - granting a "break" for a developer can come back to bit you or someone else; and There is a law of unintended consequences - changes in ordinances can have unseen results.

Uncle Gadianton
Salt Lake City, Utah

If water from a storm drain system enters private property, the owners are entitled to compensation. The Supreme Court has said that depositing water from a storm drain system onto private property constitutes a taking of the property. In essence, the city is using private property as a retention pond, and should therefore compensate the owners.

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