Comments about ‘Federal control of lands not bad, Interior Secretary Jewell tells Western governors’

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Published: Friday, June 28 2013 1:00 p.m. MDT

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one vote
Salt Lake City, UT

What else would a natural gas spokesman say. He needs to convince the coal lobby not the governors.


'Federal control of lands is bad', Utah's governor Herbert tells Secretary Jewell.

The ownership and control of everything by the Federal Government is the ultimate monopoly.

That was the dream of Karl Marx.

It is also the dream of Wall street Bankers who float all the bonds that underwrite government spending programs and take their percentage on every dollar of BIG government debt.

JoCo Ute
Grants Pass, OR

The key words here for Iron&Clay and Gov. Herbert and the rest of the extraction cabal are "federal lands". They were federal lands before the state of Utah ever existed and as federal lands ALL the citizens of our nation have legitimate concerns regarding how our national heritage is used. Citizens in Chicago, Miami, Boston and everywhere in between have just as much right to offer their concerns over the use of federal lands as do the citizens of Utah. Simply living closer to the federal lands of the west does not give westerners two votes.

Plus, I doubt that Gov. Herbert and the rest of the legislature understand just how much it costs to take care of the federal land in Utah. If the citizens of Utah had the real data on costs they'd give up any claims to federal lands in a heartbeat.

Mcallen, TX

Hmm? The folks who caused a national debt equal to $175,000 for every man, woman, and child in America,--wants to control our lands?

This is like a burglar guarding a bank, or a wolf protecting the chicken coup.

Mike Richards
South Jordan, Utah

States are not counties of the Federal Government. States are not "owned" by the Federal Government. Article 1, Section 8, Clause 17 designated a "District" that would be independent from any State which was to be the seat of the Federal Government so that no State could control the Federal Government. That "district" is not to be more than ten miles square.

The States were required to NOT control the seat of the Federal government. The Constitution has never allowed the federal government to control any land inside any State (except for military bases). Unless something is specifically enumerated in the Constitution, it is left to the States or to the people.

The wilderness areas of any State belongs to that State, not to the Federal Government. Management of those lands is the duty of the State not of the Federal Government.

Tyler McArthur
South Jordan, UT

Is she joking? Of course it is a bad thing. I don't see why states like Utah and Nevada, with huge amounts of federal land, have to put up with federal hand-tying while other states have much more control over what they do with their own state resources.

We Utahns know how to manage our resources, and how it will affect our communities, better than a set of bureaucrats in Washington ever will.

Keep up the fight Gov. Herbert, we appreciate it.

Carthage, IL

There's just one problem, here, federal officer, and that is, the FEDERAL GOVERNMENT has very limited power to own land. So uphold your Constitutional OATH and divest yourself of your unjust land holdings. This isn't some collectivist society where you get to dictate to the States what they can and cannot do with their own land.

READ YOUR CONSTITUTION and then renew your oath.

Nan BW
ELder, CO

Thomas Jefferson, as well as many more contemporary leaders, said and say that the closer a governmental entity is to the people, the more effective it will be. Of course that means that the local people should be involved, and too often they are not. However, just because we are too lazy to govern ourselves and be stewards over our resources, doesn't mean the federal government is able to do it well. As others have commented, we have a national debt that is beyond comprehension, our government is riddled with dishonesty and poor judgment and Sally Jewell is not using good common sense. Unfortunately, common sense is in short supply, especially at high levels.

DN Subscriber 2

Aside from maybe the kleptocrats who run Chicago, and the runaway spenders in California, I cannot think of any government entity that does a worse job mismanaging their area of responsibility than the federal government.

Worse than their management skills are the levels of openness and honesty which are abysmal in so many of the policy making levels of the federal government.

Ms. Jewell did a good job running a sporting goods company that catered to the elite, politically correct outdoors types. However, she and the environmental extremists running the Department of the Interior are pursing an activist agenda contrary to the interests and needs of current and future westerners and people who believe in responsible growth and improvement of man's condition on this earth.

When Congress and the feds have their enclave of the District of Columbia running as a model of efficiency and progress, then you can tell us to give you a chance to run the west. Until then, let the people closest to the land take care of it. Even if it makes some hikers from the liberal coasts unhappy.

Salt Lake City, UT

re: worf June 28

Yet, people keep voting for POTUS candidates w/ Ivy League educations who get an Lion's share of their campaigning War Chest from Wall St.

It was Jesse James who said its easier to own a bank than to rob one.

Happy Valley Heretic
Orem, UT

First land the fed should SELL Back to Utah should be Hill AF Base Then Dugway, how about that new facility at Camp Williams dirty fed money all of it…right?

The goal in privatizing everything is to give the 1% something else to own.
They're running out of things to spend their money on in their, and their grandchildren's foreseeable future.

Herbert already gave handed out our stream and river right aways, to his sponsors, so we know what to expect.

Greed as a party platform will only garner the greedy

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