Comments about ‘Hollywood in the hole; R-rated films to blame?’

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Published: Wednesday, June 26 2013 5:55 p.m. MDT

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Bifftacular
Spanish Fork, Ut

This is interesting but still old news. On average, PG and PG13 movies have grossed more (and a lot more) per movie than R rated movies have for as long as the current rating system has been in place. What is most curious about this is that there still seem to be people genuinely perplexed as to why Hollywood insists on making as many R rated films as they do. It isn't that difficult to understand. By and large, movies are made by people who are morally vapid so of course their movies reflect that. And of course, there is also the all-powerful human ego to factor in. No one is going to tell these producers that they have to censor something even though it might make financial, or heaven forbid...moral sense... to do so. Their main argument? To censor would make the film less realistic. PLEASE!!! (How many sex scenes in movies are between two elderly people...overweight people... unattractive people in general?). LOL

mikesmullin
EAGLE MOUNTAIN, UT

what WOULD be surprising is if Hollywood took responsibility for their own lame content instead of blaming internet pirates for lackluster sales

TRUTH
Salt Lake City, UT

Hollywood liberals are why no one wants to go to the movies.........every film has an undying subliminal message.....global warming, gay marriage, abortion, fracking, vote Obama, support communism.......sick of the church of Hollywood shoving its religion down our throats.......
Couldn't pay me to watch a movie these days.....and I used to go every week sometimes twice....now I haven't been in years, they all stink!

Mainly Me
Werribee, 00

It would be nice if Hollywood produced something that I would willingly pay money for. Even many PG-13 films are nothing but glorified trash with soft core porn in it. Hollywood has its own agenda: promote immorality. Sex sells.

Red
Salt Lake City, UT

I hope Hollywood goes broke.

They are doing their best to flood the earth with smut.

The Rock
Federal Way, WA

I too am sick of the church of Hollywood.
With social media it is so easy to borrow a movie from a friend and watch it without giving Hollywood any money.
I just set up a Facebook group, invited friends to join and on a Friday night when I want to watch a movie I just post to the group and ask if any body has Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. I don't even have to subscribe to Net Flicks.

Don't forget to rewind those DVDs.

Kings Court
Alpine, UT

This simplifies the issue too much. Another problem in Hollywood is that they make these action movies with $200 million dollar budgets and then lose big if the movie doesn't do well at the box office. The best returns on movies are low budget productions with high quality stories, directing, and acting. A movie that cost $3 million to make and then takes in $80 million at the box office is far more profitable than one that cost $200 million to make and then took in $250 million at the box office. Hollywood simply relies on big budget sequels. A better way to look at the results is to average production and distribution costs of making R-rated and PG-13 movies and then look at how much money the movie made and compare those stats in each rating category. Just lumping movies together in ratings categories to see how much money the average movie made tells you absolutely nothing.

Dante
Salt Lake City, UT

I agree with the basic leaning of this article--I too, would like to see fewer releases of R-rated movies and more of PG13 movies. However, the statistics cited are all about gross revenues, not net profits. The writer admits that R-rated films are cheaper to produce. And many R-rated movies are quirky, ego trip one-offs produced on low budgets for small-audience film festivals. If we were to compare say, all the net profits generated by all 2012 R-rated movies costing $20 to $40 million to produce vs. all the net profits generated by PG13 movies in the same production cost range, would the PG13 movies still average higher net profits? From this article, we have no way of knowing. While Hollywood has plenty of artistic devotees, the film industry remains most devoted to the bottom line. If R-rated movies always generated smaller net profits (not just lower gross revenue), they wouldn't keep producing them.

Ben H
Clearfield, UT

Ratings have little to do with it. For the most part, Hollywood is just not making movies that people really want to see. R-rated films can make money, but most are over the top.

DebAdams
Safford, AZ

Exciting news! My husband and I are parents of five awesome children ages 13 to 32, and we have three awesome grand children. I am a "G" rated Mom. Some of my family does watch PG, which I do not encourage. Family Feature Films are brilliant to "Clean Up" other's movies and make them viewable. The NEST series is great too. They have the Animated hero classics, New and Old Testament,Modern Prophets, and the Book of Mormon. SO... keep the films "G" so everyone can watch. Family rated movies is proven in the film industry to make more money, G rated makes the world HAPPY, they educate and uplifts the people.
We need more happiness in the world. I recently graduated with my B.S. in Elementary Education, I plan only viewing "G" rated at school too!!! Thank you for all the great movies out there. I love the movies that our church: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints produce...they are the best!!

ApacheNaiche
PINETOP, AZ

As the immortal Lou Holtz once said "Never tell anyone your problems. 20% don't care and the other 80% are glad you're having them".

PhotoSponge
nampa, ID

That's because most of what comes out of Hollywood is stupid! It has no substance. We have more intelligence than they give us credit for. They have lost the ability to write good movie screenplays. There are no more Carey Grants or Charleton Hestons or Myrna Loys; Hollywood has lost the greats.

Valjean
Los Alamos, NM

"There's a lot that today's PG-13 movies can get away with, but filmmakers may feel (an R rating) lets them tell their story more realistically and with more personality."

It leaves me wondering if an R film represents a weak mind trying to express itself forcefully.

However, the inability of screenwriters and producers to tell a compelling story within the strictures of a PG rating is just one symptom of an underlying lack of talent. I can't say that I'm impressed with most recent Hollywood films in the other ratings category.

shimmer
Orem, UT

I find it interesting that PG-13 movies make so much money seeing how they are the least creative out of any film that you can find in theaters. They are all mindless superhero/action movie sequels that rely on special effects instead of good acting, cinematography, storytelling and so on.

GZE
SALT LAKE CITY, UT

PG-13 action movies make so mcuh money because they are aimed at teen boys - who like to go to the movies.

I think a lot of the reason Hollywood is losing money at the theater is because everyone knows the movie will be out on DVD and Video on Demand within 6 months. It takes something special for me to hand ove $10+ per person to see a movie that I'll soon be able to watch for $4 for a room full of people.

The only ones we see at the theater are the ones that will be better on a big screen - like The Avengers (another reason PG13 movies are the most seen)

GD
Syracuse, UT

There are very few films worth going to. Sex, violence, crude stuff. It doesn't surprise me. I certainly don't waste my money on them.

politicalcents
West Jordan, UT

While it may be true that R-rated films have more on the bottom line, the artistic folk in Hollywood are not always about money. They often are about getting noticed and known for their abilities. What still is fact, is that more people are viewing the movies that are PG-13, PG, and G. Financially speaking, if I knew that I could draw in over a billion dollars in ticket sales by keeping it PG-13 or better, business sense would tell me to increase the profit margin while producing a quality film. Also, the ticket sales don't factor in to account post film merchandise. i.e. Star Wars apparel and toys are still being sold from movies that were made 30 years ago.

Also, facts like this show us how media truly is much more perverted than the majority of the population. Hollywood makes smutty movies and tv shows, but the majority go to see less smut. In a way, definitely gives hope in humanity a bit.

patriot
Cedar Hills, UT

Most stuff that comes out of Hollywood these days is predictable, familiar, violent, sexual, stereotyped garbage. Once in a while you will get a decent film - such as the recent Wizard of Oz - but they are few and far between. Hollywood gives the public what they want - right? So whose fault is the sharp decline in film quality?

Beaver Native
Garland, UT

Hollywood is more concerned with breaking moral boundaries than it is with providing the mainstream public with the type of entertainment the majority will support.

ClarkHippo
Tooele, UT

Steven Spielberg and George Lucas recently spoke to a group of USC film students and said a few surprising things.

First, that the Hollywood industry is less and less willing to take risk with original, creative film projects.

Second, because some films which the Hollywood industry thought would be money makers, but ended up being total flops, movie ticket prices may be going up very high. A $7.00 ticket today may by $20, $25 or possibly even $50 a year from now.

Third, that Spielbergs film "Lincoln" on;y made it to theaters because Spielberg owned part of his production company. Had another film maker directed it, it would have priemered on the History Channel, as Hollywood would not risk a period film going against the recycled super hero movies which come out every year.

My wife and I don't really go to movies in theaters anymore. If there's something we really want to see, we generally just wait until its avialable on DVD or streaming.

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