Comments about ‘Navy bans porn pinups, but underlying concerns persist’

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Published: Thursday, June 20 2013 7:35 p.m. MDT

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Mainly Me
Werribee, 00

Finally, someone doing something about this filth! FBI stats show that in either the home of a sex offender of at the crime scene, porn is present 81% of the time. In the states with the highest subscription to porn magazines, there is the highest incidence of rape. In a study done by a treatment facility in Saskatchewan, Canada, 100% of child molesters use at some type of porn.

Porn is harmless? I don't think so.

Chris B
Salt Lake City, UT

Mainly,

Porn is present in 81% of religious homes

Your stats still fail to prove causation

m.g. scott
clearfield, UT

Chris B

By porn is present in 81% of religious homes, what do you use to as a standard for a religious home? And by "present", if a person has a TV or computer and access to the net, porn can be considered present. All it takes is a few clicks.

george of the jungle
goshen, UT

In the 50's and 60's More often than not, if you walked into a full service gas station, The centerfold was up on the wall.

I know it. I Live it. I Love it.
Salt Lake City, UT

Chris B,

All that proves is that Satan is working hard against those he needs to work hard against.

You make efforts to be friendly to my faith pretty often, which I respect. I believe this is because you believe in God yourself, no? I may be wrong, but I thought you once said you were catholic, or some Christian denomination...? Anyway, yes you do stand up for religion and often... but you have these occasions where you stand up for other beliefs which aren't Christian at all.

Living a life of lust, fornication, adultery, and looking on other women with lust... these are all choices we have been taught are wrong and displease our Father in Heaven. This isn't some LDS exclusive doctrine. Sin is sin.

Satan works equally hard into fooling us into believing right is wrong and wrong is right, that sin is tolerable, that we can be forgiven on our death bed, and every other lie that exists. These are lies. The truth is known and recorded.

So with no disrespect intended, why resist such teachings? We're all capable of change, repentance, clean lives, and keeping commandments.

one old man
Ogden, UT

Yes, George, I remember those days. We've made some progress, haven't we? But there is still a long, long, long way to go.

Eliot
Santaquin, UT

I served in the US Army nearly 40 years ago. After completing my training, I reported for permanent duty and was assigned to a room in the barracks that the company clerk referred to using a colorful sexual term. When I was escorted to the room by the clerk and introduced to its occupant I soon learned why the term had been applied. Nearly every inch of wall space was covered with some sort of pornographic image. Being the new guy I didn't complain, although I surely felt very uncomfortable. Many thanks go to my sergeant who recognized my discomfort and convinced the company first sergeant to move me to a different room. At the time the army was trying to deal with problems in its ranks related to interracial relationships but paid little attention to problems associated with sexism and the treatment of women. Perhaps the time has come to provide that attention to create an environment of respect and dignity towards all who serve.

Mark B
Eureka, CA

I think we are missing the point. Right now there is only a VERY small chance that a sex offender will be brought to trial because officers, on their own, have the power to have such charges dismissed. That all changes when a would-be offender realizes that his superiors have no such authority. What hangs on the wall, by comparison, is of much less importance.

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