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Comments about ‘Jay Evensen: What Miss Utah USA should have said’

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Published: Thursday, June 20 2013 12:00 a.m. MDT

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techpubs
Sioux City, IA

In the 70's the women's movement educated young women with the knowledge that "You don't need a man to have a career and children too." What they forgot to explain was that it was better for the children to have 2 parents who cared about the well-being of each other and their children.
So it is the children who have and continue to suffer from our past mistakes.

Chris B
Salt Lake City, UT

When liberals throw out the 77 percent claim they are showing 1 of 2 things

1) They are purposefully deceitful and disingenuous(which is par for the course for liberals)

or

2) They think a nurse should make as much money as a brain surgeon

The facts are that more women than men are nurses and more men than women are surgeons

Which is it liberals,

If you had started your argument with the 91 percent, then you have a valid stat worthy of a discussion.

But since you chose to either be purposefully deceitful, there really is no point in even starting the discussion

Howard Beal
Provo, UT

The equal (or not equal) pay is a myth. In most every job I know, including mine, everyone regardless of race, gender and ethnicity are on the same pay scale.

Irony Guy
Bountiful, Utah

"Women should get equal pay for equal work. It would be hard to find someone who doesn't believe that." Au contraire, Jay, it's very easy to find someone who doesn't believe that. It appears to be the official position of the Republican party, as they keep voting against the concept, and last I looked Republicans were pretty easy to find--at least around here.

cjb
Bountiful, UT

The girls who sign up for beauty pageants are the same ones who in high school were popular, beautiful and not focused (for the most part) on academics or current events.

At these beauty pageants they ask questions of the contestants that this type of girl isn't suited to answer, .. without coaching.

This is the recipe for the entertaining answers we so often hear when watching the pageants.

The Rock
Federal Way, WA

@ Irony Guy

I am an official in the Republican Party in Washington State. I don't know of a single person in any political party that does not believe in equal pay for equal work. If you codify that in law, it should not be called "The Pay Equity Act" but "Lawyer Full Employment Act". The law suits and trouble that would follow will destroy many small businesses. Employers will be afraid to offer any financial incentive for excellence. Everyone will be paid exactly the same. There will be an inflexible pay scale.

If you attempt to equate the value of different professions then this gets really messy. Who is worth more, an engineer of a nurse? What if there is a shortage of engineers and a surplus of nurses? How does supply and demand enter in?

I could go on and on and on.

America is supposed to be a free county. We should allow employers the freedom to make their own financial decisions. If government dictates pay then employers will live in a dictatorship.

Let the market decide. Employers will pay those they want enough to keep them.

Sasha Pachev
Provo, UT

My thoughts exactly about this being the wrong type of question. That said, I also agree with "The Rock" that it is absolutely wrong to force employers to pay according to some artificially defined concept of equality. The best pay scale equalizer is free market. In a perfect free market an employer cannot afford to pay more or less than what the work is worth. It is wrong to compare two employees based on education and experience and say if those two things are equal they have equal value to the employer. Only the employer can know what value his employees give him, and if he is wrong, he will pay for it dearly - he will be out of business.

patriot
Cedar Hills, UT

Beauty pageants are a joke. I feel like I am watching a Disneyland ride.

BYU Track Star
Los Angeles, CA

My two cents now,

There were really three questions buried in Marissa Powell's Gotcha question Sunday night. First, 40 Percent of women are the primary breadwinners. If you readers and Marissa Powell have been following the news the last week or two. That 40 percent statistic also includes Single/Widowed/Divorced Mothers solely supporting their families.It also includes those women who earn more than than their unemployed or lesser paid hubbys. Second, Because women often sacrifice their careers to become mother's or family caregivers they are penalized financially from stepping off the career track. Third, Society, for better or worse, rewards those men and women who sacrifice family for career. IMHO, Ms Powell still only partially answered the question. Realistically, with the exception of Hillerry Clinton or Condi Rice at that age, 21. How many other women could have smoothly answered this ambush cocktail party question?

Seeker13
Ogden, UT

You've taken a week to ponder and formulate an idea of "what she should have said". She had about 5 seconds to decide what to say. Let it go...

atl134
Salt Lake City, UT

@Chris B
So the logical response for Republicans/conservatives is to vote against the Lily Ledbetter paycheck fairness act out of spite because Democrats used the 77% number instead of the 91% number?

red state pride
Cottonwood Heights, UT

What was so irritating about that question to me is that it was just a test question to see if the contestant had been sufficiently brainwashed by the MSM. I mean, was there a correct answer and if so could anyone deliver it succinctly? It seems as usual the answer they were looking for would just be a regurgitation of left wing claptrap.
I have to say that Miss SC's infamous answer never stops being funny. It's funnier everytime I hear it.

Truthseeker
SLO, CA

From CBS,

"Commentators have made much of this apparent breakthrough, but few have bothered to talk with James Chung to get the full story. Here it is:

It's pretty simple: more women are graduating from college than men, so more young women are qualified for higher-paying entry-level jobs. Thus, in aggregate, millennial women are earning more than millennial men as they start their careers.

Millennial Hispanic and black women make even more -- as much as twice - as Hispanic and black men of the same age. That's because the education gap is even wider between Hispanic and black young women and men than it is for whites. This doesn't mean that women in particular professions, industries or job categories are making more than their male peers. It also doesn't have anything to do with what individual women make compared to their male colleagues. And most of all, this doesn't relate to married young women or the biggest earnings barrier of all: children.

Does this contradict the recent findings of the Institute for Women's Policy Research that female-dominated professions make less than male-dominated professions? Not in the least... says Chung."

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