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Comments about ‘Deconstructing the new mommy money mentality’

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Published: Wednesday, June 19 2013 4:56 p.m. MDT

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LAnon
Cedar Hills, UT

My spouse and I have each had an allowance since we were first married. It allows us to each have spending money that we don't have to account for to the other and the rest of the household money is used to pay bills, or save for some other goal. The amount has varied depending on our current level of income and didn't matter who was bringing in most of the income. Up until recently, we each received the same amount. That changed when I left the work force and he picked up a second job. He received an increase to help cover meals he might need to eat away from home while doing that second job rather than have him just charge those meals to the credit card on the days when he didn't have time to fix something at home to take with him.

That allowance has sometimes been spent in the month rceived and sometimes it has been saved and used for a bigger purchase later. Either way, the other spouse has had no say in how it is spent, even if we might think it was a foolish purchase.

LAnon
Cedar Hills, UT

Continued from previous comment: By the way, whether I was working or not, I am the one with the checkbook and pay all the bills but he has the debit card and two credit cards. We have never had to ask each other for money although we have had discussions about whether or not there were sufficient funds to cover a desired purchase. While our allowances can be spent however we would like, large dollar purchases using other funds (pretty much anything over $100) are always discussed between the two of us before they are made. This practice has made for a mostly trouble free 19+ years of marriage.

Blitz Chomney
Holladay, UT

"62.1 percent of all women in the workforce aged 16 to 52 have had a baby in the past 12 months". That statistic is ridiculously incorrect.

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