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Comments about ‘Doug Robinson: It's about time golf took a mulligan on anchored putter decision’

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Published: Tuesday, May 21 2013 7:04 p.m. MDT

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oddman
,

In the grand scheme of things...Who really cares?

Louisiana Cougar
Pineville, LA

Giggle! To describe Orville Moody as "a great putter" is laughable. "Old Sarge" was still awful even with the big putter -- but he was famous as a superb ball striker. He won one big tournament and was the proverbial "one hit wonder" of music fame.

Moody was just more awful with the little putter -- as many of us are. Golf is five different games at once and putting is the one that matters most.

I have no quarrel with the R & A and the USGA in making a rule change. My biggest concern is that golf is not being promoted with today's youth and many of them sit around and play video games or text each other. In addition, golf courses need to address the real issue that is killing golf: the five-hour round.

I love golf and have played over fifty years. Too bad it takes too long to innovate. We need more courses that use the controlled flight ball that goes only half the distance so we can create more short courses that cost less to maintain and are more fun for people of all ages.

Red Headed Stranger
Billy Bobs, TX

Tiger Woods said "as I was saying all year, is something that's not in the traditions of the game."

Really, so Tiger is concerned about the traditions of the game? What about using carbon fiber or titanium in golf clubs? Did they use irons traditionally in Scotland? No. They hand carved their own clubs. I think that true players who truly respect the traditions of the game should be handed their own knives and chunks of wood, and before hitting the ball hand carve their own clubs out of persimmon wood. Where is the sport in having someone else make your own equipment for you? Where science and exotic metal alloys beat out a good whittlin' knife?

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