Comments about ‘'Hannibal' doesn't belong on network TV’

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Published: Thursday, May 2 2013 3:30 p.m. MDT

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james d. morrison
Boise, CA

The same night I'm flipping through the channel and see some disturbing scenes on Hannibal, they also had Scandal on tv at the same time with a guy doing torture killing a la Dexter. A very disturbing night on tv.

Cedarcreek320
Star Valley Ranch, WY

What happened to "Free Agency"? If you don't like it, don't watch it.

Hutterite
American Fork, UT

KSL never makes a wrong call in this neighbourhood, eh? It isn't just the state that can take on the role of nanny.

Henry Drummond
San Jose, CA

In the past when KSL passed on a show it could still be seen on another cable channel. I suspect that is what is going to happen here. You can still exercise your "free agency." I would hate to see the day come when parents felt they had to put a "parental control" lock on a station like KSL.

John Charity Spring
Back Home in Davis County, UT

This is not a mere matter of free agency. Anyone who claims that it is is either trying to fool themselves, the public, or both.

Study after study confirms that viewers of violent entertainment engage in violent acts themselves at far higher rates than the general public. Indeed, the studies confirm that this applies to all types of violence, including domestic violence and sexual violence. That is the reason why this is a much bigger issue than mere "free agency."

In essence, the entire public pays a terrible cost for the so-called right of the minority to entertain itself by watching violence presented as entertainment. Certain members of the community become victims of violence, while all members pay the cost in terms of broken families, disease, and increased taxes to pay for law enforcement and social services.

Shame on the producers of violent entertainment, and shame on those who chose to watch it and then inflict violence on others. Both groups deserve swift and severe condemnation.

chinamom
Cottonwood Heights, UT

Hmmmm....Hugh Dancy...."relative newcomer" ????.....Perhaps I am mis-interpreting what the columnist is trying to say (newcomer to the show?) , but Mr Dancy has been acting for YEARS. Just check his online Bio to see the list of his work...mostly BBC, but also big-screen USA movies (Confessions of a Shopaholic, The Jane Austen BookClub, Ella Enchanted to name a few). Perhaps the columnist should do a bit more homework......

Palmetto Bug
Columbia, SC

I've only seen a couple episodes of Hannibal, and while it may be violent, the violence on the show is no worse than what can be found elsewhere on network TV. The show airs at 10:00 EST, which time slot is typically reserved for more mature programming once kids have gone to bed. The mountain time zones air these programs at 9:00, before kids go to bed, which may be part of the problem.

Che26
SALT LAKE CITY, UT

I'm not sure what shows you are watching. But Hannibal is far worse then anything I have seen on broadcast television, and I watch a lot of TV. Hannibal rivals the violence of some cabal channels and the violence they produce.

Say what you will about KSL taking Hannibal out of the line-up, but there is no doubt this is a new level of violence for broadcast television.

It is interesting that this coincides with the FCC stating the want to lower broadcast television standards because their tired of reading complaints. Heaven forbid they actually do their jobs and then maybe they wouldn't receive as many complaints.

Mormoncowboy
Provo, Ut

John Charity Spring:

Please name one such study.

I'm usually a critic of the Church, but I don't see any problem with this. KSL is a privately owned station and has the right to market the products it would like. If KSL were trying to take some kind of legal action preventing any network from running the show, that would be a problem, but as it stands they have a right to air the content to deem to do.

Kralon
HUNTINGTON BEACH, CA

I have to agree with the article author (Jim Bennett) on this one. I have watched and enjoyed other violent shows such as 'Breaking Bad' and 'Dexter' and 'Hannibal' is a new level of violence and does not belong on network TV.

The purpose and type of violence does make a difference and 'Hannibal' is more disturbing than anything I've seen on TV before. One way of maintaining an interested audience is by pushing boundaries which is what 'Hannibal' is doing, but I view it similar to swearing - as the last resort of a feeble mind.

JanSan
Pocatello, ID

I get a kick out of people yelling.."if you don't like it just turn the channel". The problem is that you turn the channel then turn the channel then turn the channel etc etc. Between the sex and violence there are hardly any channels worth watching out there anymore. I have just as much right to be able to turn on my TV and find good programs to watch as those who want to watch sex and violence do. I am grateful for KSL for doing this. At least I know there is one channel that has some values still left in it programming.

Emjay
Somewhere in Time, UT

Dear Mormoncowboy: Dr. Victor Kline, a professor at U of U, did extensive studies regarding sex and violence on TV and concluded that they desensitize human beings to violence and lead to more violence in society. His research is highly respected even to the point that when he was scheduled to testify before the Commerce Subcommittee of the U.S. House of Representatives, the opposition tried to get him eliminated from the hearing because they knew his testimony would be so powerful they wouldn't be able to attack it or discredit his research. That is a fact. I worked on that committee.

one old man
Ogden, UT

Good article and exactly right. (And it's a cold day in July when I find myself agreeing with John C Spring.)

Is the increase in violent and other disgusting kinds of TV just the beginning of one more thing that will help bring down America as we know it? Will it wind up with a completely out of control situation involving the First Amendment as we now have with the Second?

Or will we find the collective wisdom to get garbage off the air NOW? I don't watch this junk, but I'm still affected by it indirectly. Sort of like second hand smoke. We found the courage to limit that, let's do the same with violent and disgusting TV.

Unfortunately, I don't see much hope for any form of collective wisdom in this nation. Maybe we can turn to the NRA for help since they seem to want to blame all our ills with gun violence on TV.

MormonSean
Salt Lake City, UT

Cedarcreek320,

Censorship doesn't take away freedom. Taking it off the airwaves does not take away one's moral agency.

You don't own KSL, I don't own KSL. We don't decide what goes on KSL. The owner of KSL and KSL get to decide. THAT is what preserves agency. THEY choose because THEY own it. And we all have the right to say "we support the decision" or not to. Did agency get taken away in any of that? No.

statman
Lehi, UT

A couple points:

Censorship is government imposed, not a tv station choosing not to air a controversial show.

The 'free agency' argument is bunk. Going down that road, anything and everything should be okay on public airwaves - kiddie porn, snuff movies, everything. Any public standards take away from agency, right?

I'm a big fan of some violent shows - Breaking Bad, Sopranos, Supernatural, etc. I watched part of the first episode of Hannibal and found it to be disturbing enough that I couldn't watch any more. If it disturbs me, that's saying something. If the producers of the show want to put it n HBO or Showtime, no one would argue about it at all.

Utahute72
Tooele, UT

I'll tell you something, if the networks wanted to really upgrade the programming they should dump all those stupid reality shows, talk about driving someone to the point of homicide.

Secondly I find Hannibal no worse than The Following and probably better written.

Lastly, if KSL is really about preserving prime time TV, why not simply move the show to a late night slot?

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