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Comments about ‘Groupthink: the death of civility’

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Published: Friday, April 26 2013 8:30 a.m. MDT

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My2Cents
Taylorsville, UT

Not sure why this quote of group-think and civility have any similarity Other than in a civil discussion among cowards everyone is afraid to speak their mind or stand up for their convictions and input.

Civil discussions have one leader, one mind, one outcome, substantial failure.

Its time to kill civil and promote convictions and facts and truth and equal authority to all member's of a group discussion. Any business or government that operates or functions on the premise of civility will have nothing but chaos and disorder and massive failure. Think groups should never be permanent or the same people.

The very essence of the state of this country and all its government agency's failure is civility. Laws without meaning or substance or enforcment are the results of civil failures. Even the news media is not reliable and less than factual in the novelist system of crating its fictional news.

m.g. scott
clearfield, UT

Another disaster caused by this phenomonon was the biggest airplane crash in history at Tenerife where two 747s crashed on a foggy runway. The captain of one of the planes began a takeoff when the other two cockpit people, the co-pilot and flight engineer, knew the runway might not be clear. They were intimidated by the experience and senority of the captain, who kind of ignored their misgivings about the runway being cleared for takeoff. I think the lesson of this is, if you are a leader, tell the people under you that if they have input or ideas, don't be afraid to say so. And be sincere, as I think a lot of people fear losing their job or their status if they contradict a leader. Hopefully anyone who gets an important leadership position would have enough self confidence to accept advice rather than feel slighted by a subordinate who informs them of something they don't know.

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