Comments about ‘Muslim leaders denounce violence as focus turns to bombers' faith’

Return to article »

Published: Tuesday, April 23 2013 5:00 p.m. MDT

Comments
  • Oldest first
  • Newest first
  • Most recommended
JoeBlow
Far East USA, SC

I can certainly understand the uneasiness of the Muslim community.

What would be really refreshing is to have the Muslim community start proactively combating the radicals in their ranks. There are people who know that some among them have a high potential to commit these acts. Not always, but certainly sometimes.

We need to hear stories of Muslim leaders calling in and notifying the authorities about those who exhibit radical tendencies.

We need the Muslim community to take a public and active role in combating this problem.

That would go a long way in repairing the public perception.

xscribe
Colorado Springs, CO

Whose public perception? Those paranoid of Muslims? How many people of the US have been killed by Muslims compared to the rest of the country at large?

Tolstoy
salt lake, UT

The 22 terrorist that have attacked the US and claim they did so because they are Muslim are .0004 perecent of the over. 5,000,000 Muslims in the US.

JoeBlow
Far East USA, SC

Look, I am anything but Anti-muslim.

But to deny that, when we hear of a bomb going off in a crowd, it is not unreasonable to suspect Muslim radicals. And in this day and age, one would be right more often than not.

We should not blame the whole Muslim community, but one cannot deny it.

The Muslim community needs to take a more active role in addressing this problem

Tyler D
Meridian, ID

In a way I feel sorry for these Muslim leaders (despite the disingenuous attempt by Wajahat Ali noted in this article to play the race card). Clearly they see their religion as a religion of peace and spiritual struggle (or surrender), and there are no doubt many passages in the Koran that support this view of Islam.

But sadly, there are many other passages that support the violence practiced by Bin Laden and the Boston bombers, which is not the case with many other religions (e.g., why we do not have a Tibetan Buddhist terror problem, despite the many justified grievances of their community).

As long as the entire Koran is seen by Muslims as the “perfect word of the Creator,” Muslims who adhere to one interpretation of their holy book will be forever apologizing for their Muslin brothers who adhere to another interpretation of the same text.

The conclusion of the article is entirely correct – unless Muslims begin policing their own (e.g., excommunications, notifying authorities before acts are committed, etc…) Islamic terrorism will likely never end.

lost in DC
West Jordan, UT

I admire the courage of those leaders who are speaking out, even though they may be painting a target on their backs.

I do have a problem with Mr. Ali ranting about the “powerful privilege of whiteness”, since the alleged perpetrators are white.

JoeBlow,
I suspect many Muslims ARE proactively working with the police, but that fact is not being made public because the police know better than to disclose their sources. I suspect such activity has already prevented a number of incidents similar to the marathon bombing. Occasionally we hear about thwarted attacks – I suspect the Islamic community provided information vital to stopping those attacks.

Tolstoy,
You say there were 22 Muslim terrorists who have attacked the US out of 5 million US Muslims. I’ve not counted the non-Muslim terrorists; McVey and his accomplice, Unabomber, Atlanta Olympics bomber are the only ones that come to mind right now, but say there were 22, or 44, or even 100. 100 out of 320 million is a lot lower incidence than 22 out of 5 million. .00003 percent vs .0004 percent

atl134
Salt Lake City, UT

@JoeBlow
"What would be really refreshing is to have the Muslim community start proactively combating the radicals in their ranks. There are people who know that some among them have a high potential to commit these acts. "

That's already happened. It's been reported that a disproportionately high percentage of reports to officials of that kind of nature are calls from Muslims.

@Tyler D
"But sadly, there are many other passages that support the violence practiced by Bin Laden and the Boston bombers, which is not the case with many other religion"

Christianity isn't one of those though. There are plenty of Old Testament verses in particular that support as much like that time God got mad that they didn't destroy a particular enemy as thoroughly as God wanted.

VST
Bountiful, UT

Here is the real problem Tolstoy.

Except for this Utah group, those other 5 million have not been openly vocal about disavowing and condemning the actions of the other 0.004 percent who are the terrorists in their midst.

thunderbolt7
DUTCH JOHN, UT

Why are Muslims forced to defend themselves every time a bomb goes off? Do white people receive the same treatment? The difference is that Islamic theology supports terrorism. Muslim terrorists get inspiration and motivation from Islam; some Muslim religious leaders create religious arguments to give would be jihadists reassurance they are doing the right thing. This proclivity to violence is not found in white culture nor in Christianity, where violence is unequivocally condemned. By contrast, Islamic writing and theology contains weasel words that radicals use to inspire terrorism.

Yorkshire
City, Ut

USA Today reported yesterday that the Islamic Society of Boston mosque in Cambridge, Mass is suspected of having a negative influence on the Boston bomber suspects:

"Terror suspects, fugitives and radical speakers have passed through the Cambridge mosque that the Tsarnaev brothers are known to have visited.
The mosque attended by the two brothers accused in the Boston Marathon double bombing has been associated with other terrorism suspects, has invited radical speakers to a sister mosque in Boston and is affiliated with a Muslim group that critics say nurses grievances that can lead to extremism.
Several people who attended the Islamic Society of Boston mosque in Cambridge, Mass., have been investigated for Islamic terrorism"

oldschool
Farmington, UT

I believe in freedom of religion. And that's the chief reason I have deep suspicions about Islam. The Muslim view is that I may not convert to Christianity, I may not promote Christianity, I may not portray Muhammad, I may not criticize Muhammad, and I may not proselytize Christianity. The penalty in many Muslim countries is death or life in prison. No wonder the religion keeps growing. Like a violent American mob, I risk assassination if I leave. Any religion that does not allow others to practice a peaceful religion is not worthy of protection under the law. Your rights end when you impinge upon my rights.

atl134
Salt Lake City, UT

@thunderbolt7
"The difference is that Islamic theology supports terrorism. "

Except most Muslims don't believe that Islamic theology supports terrorism.

"This proclivity to violence is not found in white culture "

That's racist.

"nor in Christianity, where violence is unequivocally condemned."

Doesn't stop some people from doing stuff like shooting abortion doctors in the name of Christianity, kinda makes one think that most Christians don't believe that Christian theology supports terrorism, but some do. Would rather explain a lot of the colonial oppression, slavery, crusades, inquisitions... all that stuff scattered throughout history. It's not like we're using a different Bible now.

to comment

DeseretNews.com encourages a civil dialogue among its readers. We welcome your thoughtful comments.
About comments